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Hey guys,

I know there arre a few newb threads going around but I wanted to start my own just to introduce myself and say hello. I am 23 and have always been interested in boxing (as long as i can remember) I have a martial arts background and even trained in some MMA. I started boxing over a month ago and i am learning very quickly. I have allready sparred a few times and have shown some improvment. I hope to have my first bout in about 3-4 months. Boxing is definitley alot harder than anticapated so respect goes out to all my fellow boxers out there it takes a certain person to just spar in the ring let alone compete!! So anyway theres my hello and now I have a quick question:D . In sparring I hesitate alot I normally only throw out jabs and am very hesitant with throwing anything else. Any pointers on this? thanks
 

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Texas Tyrant said:
Hey guys,

I know there are a few newby threads going around, but I wanted to start my own just to introduce myself and say hello.
I'm glad your here!

By the username you'd chosen I get the impression that your from Texas.

FORT WORTH, Texas is my hometown.

Texas Tryant said:
I'm 23 and have always been interested in boxing (as long as I can remember).

I have a martial arts background and even trained in some MMA.

I started boxing over a month ago and I'm learning very quickly.

I have already sparred a few times and have shown some improvment.

I hope to have my first bout in about 3-4 months.

Boxing is definitley a lot harder than anticapated, so respect goes out to all my fellow boxers out there.

It takes a certain person to just spar in the ring, let alone compete!!

So any way there's my hello, and now I have a quick question:

In sparring, I hesitate alot.

I normally only throw out jabs, and am very hesitant with throwing anything else.

Any pointers on this?
thanks
I have a 20 year old nephew, that has a some what similiar back grounds as yours.

He had taken up martial arts at a very young age, and in high school he had also taken up amatuer wrestling.

He's attending college now, and had continued in amatuer wrestling there up until just recently, and chose to take up boxing.

Unbeknowed to me until just recently, he like you since he was a kid was interested in boxing, and had wanted to take up amatuer boxing but just never did, for whatever reason.

Other than myself, there are and have been are few ex-fighters and boxers in our family, so maybe that could have had some influence in his decision to turn from martial arts, and wrestling amatuer now, to take up boxing, I'm not sure.

I visited with him some months ago, and in boxing in getting started, he's in about the same place in which you are now in getting started having now taken up boxing.

As for the question you asked, that is rather an common thing for a person to experience when that first take up boxing.

Experience will take care of that!

Martials arts, is a very different thing from boxing.

As for Free Style Fighting, or the MMA thing you mentioned. That's very different too.

In time, and as you gain more experience, and you continue to spar you'll become more conditioned to taking punches. That is, you'll get more use to taking punches.

The reason you are holding back now, is because your afraid of getting hit, taking a punch.

This is the reason, your holding back.

But you'll get use to it after a while, and as you come to learn more how to box you'll become more confident and overcome your fear of getting hit, taking a punch.

Most every body is like that when they first take up boxing.

Your jabbing, jabbing, jabbing, which is good, but your afraid to throw that right hand because you fear getting hit back if you do. This is why your holding back.

If your being over matched as for your sparring partners. I could even more understand you being fearful of taking a punch. Not saying you are being over matched, just saying if you are?

Actually, that's the problem with taking up martial arts bacically, the training is different, the sparring is different, and just like wrestlers they can't take a punch either. Only, because they aren't use to taking punches.

But of course, you got to be in shape for it, however. Being able to take a punch is as much physical conditioning to it as mental conditioning to it.

Boxing is good, its a great fitness and confidence builder. It will toughen you in body, and toughen you in mind.

JJC
 

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thanks for the response jjc. I am from houston. your are right boxing is a whole new ball game compared to martial arts. Now I know why they call it the sweet science!! Thanks for the advice on why i am hesitating. Ill let you guys know yhhow my first fight goes allthough you will probably hear from me before then
 

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Texas Tyrant said:
thanks for the response jjc. I am from houston. your are right boxing is a whole new ball game compared to martial arts. Now I know why they call it the sweet science!! Thanks for the advice on why i am hesitating. Ill let you guys know yhhow my first fight goes allthough you will probably hear from me before then
hello mate and welcome to the board. :thumbsup:
 

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Texas Tyrant said:
thanks for the response jjc.

I am from houston.
I use to live Houston.

Texas Tryant said:
Your are right boxing is a whole new ball game compared to martial arts.

Now I know why they call it the sweet science!!
There's much to know, much to learn.

Go slowly, don't get in a hurry.

Texas Tyrant said:
Thanks for the advice on why I am hestiating.

I'll let you guys know how my first fight goes although you will probably hear from me before then.
That's great!

Get in the best shape you can, eat the right food, and don't keep late nights, and stay away from the negative stuff, so you can be of the right frame of mind to go out there and win.

JJC
 

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Hey JJC, just out of curiosity, what is a good diet for a boxer. Right now i just eat healthy stuff during the week and eat what i want on weekends. I try to read up on diets but once it gets complicated like counting stuff or anythin then count me out i hate that crap!! Do you have any ideas on a simple diet?-
 

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Texas Tyrant said:
JJC, just out of curiosity, what is a good diet for a boxer.
Its important of course, that you eat the right food.

You want to careful in selecting the foods that will give brain speed and power, and that will increase physical strength and energy, and that will give you more and more power.

You want to just have a well balanced diet that's all.

I would suggest and only for just an example, in the mornings for breakfast you might have a poached egg, a dish of fruit and a glass of low fat milk.

For lunch, perhaps just a of bowel soup.

For supper, perhaps a steak and a salad.

Eat NO fried foods, or deserts, other than fruit.

If you tend to gain weight easily, DO NOT eat pasta dishes and rich foods with spiey sauces and things such as that.

Texas Tryant said:
Right now, I just eat healthy stuff during the week and eat what I want on weekends.
NOT good!

You told me that your in training for a fight!

You don't want to stop eating the right food, only because its the weekend.


Texas Tyrant said:

I try to read up on diets but once it gets complicated like counting stuff or anything then count me out I hate that crap!!
You don't need to do all that!

Its only just people who are trying to make money selling dietary stuff that get people into thinking they have need of doing that kind of stuff.

You just have need to eat three square meals a day, and to have well balanced meals.

But you do want to avoid fatty foods, eat NO junk food. DO NOT eat in fast foods restaurants.

A boxer's body should be all muscle and bone.

As a boxer you want to have a body that looks like a dried rasin, not a grape.

I want to add to that DO NOT keep late nights! You want to be in bed by 10:00 pm, and no later than 10:30 pm. You need to be getting 8 hours sleep a night.

I hope your up at day break for roadwork (running), every morning, if your not you need to start.

JJC
 

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Texas Tyrant said:
Hey JJC, just out of curiosity, what is a good diet for a boxer. Right now i just eat healthy stuff during the week and eat what i want on weekends. I try to read up on diets but once it gets complicated like counting stuff or anythin then count me out i hate that crap!! Do you have any ideas on a simple diet?-
Welcome Tyrant, lots of good people on this site.

Try and eat whole foods, and particularly, foods with a low glycemic index. (Google it, it's not complicated, really!)

Low glycemic foods release sugar slowly into the bloodstream, ensuring a constant flow of energy. Unlike the junk you eat on the weekends, this approach will provide you with steady energy and reduce cravings. You'll be able to eat more food if you make healthy choices.

It's a big mistake to deprive yourself of carbohydrates, so be careful. Depleting your carbohydrate stores can be dangerous if you are a high intensity athlete, such as boxers are.

Fruit= simple carbohydrate
Whole grains=complex carbohydrates.

You can't go wrong with chicken, fish and beef, lots of vegetables (raw, or steamed is best), whole grain foods (real oats, whole grain breads, milled flax--goes in the oats or a smoothie, adds fibre and protein)

Okay, so it's easy to remember this way:
Protein: (lean beef, chicken or fish -- egg whites are good, too)
Carbohydrates: vegetables, vegetables, vegetables!
Fruit before 4pm is best, so you don't have to deal with the sugar in the evening, and get a good nights' sleep.

Drink real juice and lots of water.

No condiments, except maybe a touch of mustard. No ketchup or bbq sauce, it's all sugar, basically. Mayo, well, it's all fat, and it's not really food.

Milk has a lot of sugar in it, (lactose) but you need your calcium...find another source if you don't want to drink a lot of milk.

A good multivitamin can't hurt either.
 

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Thanks for all the great advice guys. Eating is one of the hardest things for me, I love junk food. But I will cut it out on weekends. And yes I do wake up in the morn and do a 1 mile run it aint much but i just started. To be honest i am just really lazy so all of this workout stuff is difficult for me becuz i would rather grab a burger sit on my ass and watch tv. My ambition to be a pro fighter definitley outweighs my desire to be a couch potatoe though so i do get moving! Once I get this eating thing down though I should be good to go.:thumbsup:
Heres what I ate today if you can please critique it.

I woke up and had a slice of bread with peanut butter before my run to give me fuel. when i got done i had oatmeal with peanut butter and a little splenda for breakfast. For lunch i had a turkey sandwich on wheat with lettuce and mayo only with chips. for dinner i had some chicken and corn and for a bedtime snack i had an apple with peanut butter. I also drink some sort of muscle milk before bed to help with hunger through the night. I only have one soda a day the rest is water or milk
I can allready see where some of this is bad due to the posts you guys left earlier but what exactly would you change? I am a simple minded guy if anyone knows where I could get a shopping list with meal plans or you want to post your own i would appreciate it. Thanks
 

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Texas Tyrant said:
And yes I do wake up in the morn and do a 1 mile run it aint much but i just started. To be honest i am just really lazy so all of this workout stuff is difficult for me becuz i would rather grab a burger sit on my ass and watch tv. My ambition to be a pro fighter definitley outweighs my desire to be a couch potatoe though so i do get moving! Once I get this eating thing down though I should be good to go.:thumbsup:
Heres what I ate today if you can please critique it.

I woke up and had a slice of bread with peanut butter before my run to give me fuel. when i got done i had oatmeal with peanut butter and a little splenda for breakfast. For lunch i had a turkey sandwich on wheat with lettuce and mayo only with chips. for dinner i had some chicken and corn and for a bedtime snack i had an apple with peanut butter. I also drink some sort of muscle milk before bed to help with hunger through the night. I only have one soda a day the rest is water or milk
I can allready see where some of this is bad due to the posts you guys left earlier but what exactly would you change? I am a simple minded guy if anyone knows where I could get a shopping list with meal plans or you want to post your own i would appreciate it. Thanks
If you are going to eat peanut butter, make sure it is natural...otherwise you are eating a lot of sugar for nothing. Check out a health food store or a grocery store that offers the "self-serve all natural" option. It's like a coffee grinder, except with peanuts. About the same price, too.

Soda is useless, it is full of sugar and sodium.

Anyways, here are some links that are helpful when determining what type of foods are best to eat. All bodies are a little bit different in how they handle fuel, so with a bit of useful information, you can start experimenting with your own engine to determine the best fuel for you.

The Glycemic Index (excellent reference site for simple and complex carbohydrates, the idea is to eat as many Low Glycemic foods as possible, to ensure sustained energy. Have a few high glycemic foods when in need of a boost of energy, like before your run...) Check out the GI Database tool, it's easy to use.

This is a short explaination of carbohydrates:
You've probably seen ads for low-carb foods and diets, but kids and adults need carbohydrates (say: kar-bo-hi-draytz). Most foods contain carbohydrates, which the body breaks down into simple sugars - the major source of energy for the body.

Two Types of Carbohydrates
There are two major types of carbohydrates in foods: simple and complex.

Simple carbohydrates: These are also called simple sugars. Simple sugars are found in refined sugars, like the white sugar you'd find in a sugar bowl. If you have a lollipop, you're eating simple carbohydrates. But you'll also find simple sugars in more nutritious foods, such as fruit and milk. It's better to get your simple sugars from food like fruit and milk. Why? Because they contain vitamins, fiber, and important nutrients like calcium. A lollipop does not.

Complex carbohydrates: These are also called starches. Starches include grain products, such as bread, crackers, pasta, and rice. As with simple sugars, some complex carbohydrate foods are better choices than others. Refined (say: ree-find) grains, such as white flour and white rice, have been processed, which removes nutrients and fiber. But unrefined grains still contain these vitamins and minerals. Unrefined grains also are rich in fiber, which helps your digestive system work well. Fiber helps you feel full, so you are less likely to overeat these foods. That explains why a bowl of oatmeal fills you up better than sugary candy that has the same amount of calories as the oatmeal.

So which type of carbs should you eat? Both can be part of a healthy diet.

How the Body Uses Carbohydrates
When you eat carbohydrates, the body breaks them down into simple sugars. These sugars are absorbed into the bloodstream. As the sugar level rises in your body, the pancreas releases a hormone called insulin. Insulin is needed to move sugar from the blood into the cells, where the sugar can be used as a source of energy.

When this process goes fast - as with simple sugars - you're more likely to feel hungry again soon. When it occurs more slowly, as with a whole-grain food, you'll be satisfied longer. These types of complex carbohydrates give you energy over a longer period of time.

The carbohydrates in some foods (mostly those that contain a lot of simple sugars) cause the blood sugar level to rise more quickly than others. Scientists have been studying whether eating foods that cause big jumps in blood sugar may be related to health problems like diabetes and heart disease. You're probably already on the right track if you are limiting simple sugars (such as candy) and eating more complex carbohydrates (like vegetables, oatmeal, and whole-grain wheat bread).


A one mile run is a good start, and be sure to up the amount of distance on a regular basis, set a goal for yourself...every two weeks, add a half mile or so.

Try to have five small "meals", and avoid snacking before bed, it can upset sleep.

Personally, my body doesn't like me to put anything in it after about 7pm. I drink water or non-caffeinated tea, instead of eating.

When you eat whole foods (non-processed, not full of additives and preservatives) you can eat a lot more because they are all "good" calories, and your body will break them down as energy, use them to repair depleted muscles and NOT store it as fat.

Personally, I eat oatmeal in the morning (7 am)with a sprinkle of raisins for flavour/sweetener, as well as two heaping tablespoons of milled flax seed. I take a multi
vitamin and drink a glass of skim milk.

Around ten am I have a protein shake mixed with water. (4-5 oz of water...I find this snack prevents the cravings mid-morning)

Lunch is always protein and vegetables. Usually chicken or tuna with mixed lettuce and some peppers, brocolli, and cucumber. A couple of drops of oil mixed with lemon juice instead of salad dressings from a bottle.

Around 2:30 in the afternoon, I'll have a piece of fruit, usually a banana or an apple.

Supper (6 pm usually) is always vegetable / protein / complex carbohydrate.

Usually brocolli, carrot, zuchinni, yams, carrots, cauliflower or snowpeas. I usually have beef or fish (4-6 oz) and a small portion of whole grain rice or pasta.

I do this six days a week, and take one day off a week. I may eat the odd "unhealthy" food, but I make reasonable choices and eat reasonable portions. (ie.: pizza or a burger, a few chips or a dessert)

I do cardio in the morning (30 minutes) and other workouts in the evening before supper. (skating/ice hockey -- bag work/calisthenics/stretching -- weight lifting)

Yes, horror of horrors, I lift weights! :D Not a good idea if you are boxing, so disregard the weights. However, I do circuits with my weights, and a lot of compound movements to imitate sports, as opposed to "traditional bodybuilding excercises".

The following link will help you with workouts for fitness without the use of any weights… Calesthetics Workout Creator It’s all interval training, and you can specify the lengths of rounds and rest as well. Check it out.

Send me a private message if you want to communicate via e'mail regarding nutrition...

Good luck and stick with it!
 

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Hey, Texas Tyrant.

All this that Jetstar posted in very good.

As for what I shared with you as for the examples I gave for breakfast, lunch and supper is just simply what I eat when I was boxing not in between fights, but while I was in training for inner city fights when I was an open-class middleweight in the late 1960s, and an open fighter as a light heavyweight in the early 1970s in the amatuer ranks.

I always trained and worked daily in between fights, only trained harder when I had upcoming inner city tourament fights.

Usually, I trained three months to get into peak condition for an upcoming fight!

As for the food recommended that a fighter (boxer) should eat may differ with different fight trainers.

Of course, there's much more talk out there about nutrition today.

But as for my diet while in training for an up coming fight was a bit different than when I was in between fights.

I eat the things I did while in training to keep my weight down, to be able to make the weight in.

In those days, in the amatuer and professional ranks there were only eight weight divisions.

For example, when I was a middleweight the weight limit was 160 pounds.

You couldn't weight more than that to be a middleweight.

It came to be seemingly especially near always a strain for me to keep my weight down is why I ate the food I did, and the way I did when I was a middleweight.

But later as a light heavyweight that was also the food I ate when in training for an up coming fight when I finally moved up to the next weight division as a light heavyweight in the early 1970s.

When I was a middleweight I usually weighted in for fights at 157-160 pounds, and later as a light heavyweight I usually weighed in 168-172 pounds.

Of course, today now at age 55, I'm not fighting in competition any more. But I still train and workout daily very near the same as I did more than 30 years ago. At five ten (actually 5' 10 1/2"), I still maintian that weight 168-172 pounds. Only, for reasons that I've always be a kind of conditioning freak since I was kid, and have remained so to this day.

Finally, I want to add this that you may find some what helpful in addition to the things Jetstar shared with you. But I'm not going to say much about it in this post for it would make for my post too long a read if I did.


The seven principal classes of nutrients are:

1. PROTEIN, largely composes muscles, organs, antibodies, and all enzymes.

2. CARBOHYRATES, the body's principal source of energy.

* Simple Carbohyrates -- all sugars including dextrose, maltose, lactose, table, sugars (sucrose).

* Complex Carbhyydrates -- primarily straches. Some examples are bread, rice, pasta, beans, fruits, vegetables and potatoes.

3. VITAMINS, helps to regulate many bodily functions, including the digestive and nevrous system.

4. MINERALS, essential for numberous processes from bone formation to heart functions; they become part of the body.

5. FATS, Numberous body functions from warmth to maintaining healthy skin.

6. FIBER, aids in the elimination of body waste and reduces the risk of contracting certian diseases; the indigestible part of the carbohyrate.

7. WATER, basis for all body fluids, cell processes and organ functions.

All the foods containing the above constituents to any degree are valuable for the perfect nourishment and maintenance of the body in a state of normal health.

In other words, to maintian good health you should eat from the seven classes of food daily.

If one or more are omitted, you will suffer the consequences of under-nourishment.

There are other important factors to be taken into consideration, such as the right proportion of foods in each of the seven classes.

They must also be combined in such a way that on entering the stomach they can be acted upon by various digestive juices with the mininum expenditure of energy.


JJC
 

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Man, thanks for the great replies guys. Better than I anticipated!:thumbsup:
 

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Texas Tyrant said:
Thanks for all the great advice guys. Eating is one of the hardest things for me, I love junk food. But I will cut it out on weekends. And yes I do wake up in the morn and do a 1 mile run it aint much but i just started. To be honest i am just really lazy so all of this workout stuff is difficult for me becuz i would rather grab a burger sit on my ass and watch tv. My ambition to be a pro fighter definitley outweighs my desire to be a couch potatoe though so i do get moving! Once I get this eating thing down though I should be good to go.:thumbsup:
Heres what I ate today if you can please critique it.

I woke up and had a slice of bread with peanut butter before my run to give me fuel. when i got done i had oatmeal with peanut butter and a little splenda for breakfast. For lunch i had a turkey sandwich on wheat with lettuce and mayo only with chips. for dinner i had some chicken and corn and for a bedtime snack i had an apple with peanut butter. I also drink some sort of muscle milk before bed to help with hunger through the night. I only have one soda a day the rest is water or milk
I can allready see where some of this is bad due to the posts you guys left earlier but what exactly would you change? I am a simple minded guy if anyone knows where I could get a shopping list with meal plans or you want to post your own i would appreciate it. Thanks
If you want to know what to eat and how to eat healthy, go onto google and type in the name "Vince Maradeo", I know him and worked out at his gym before. He is a former natural universe and natural MR. America twice.
 

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Good post JCC, I failed to mention to Tyrant, as you did, that it's important to make a distinction between "training nutrition" and "preparing for a contest-making weight" nutrition.

You'll probably want a few more calories when you're not trying to make weight, and you'll want to be strict about what and how much you eat when you're trying to make weight.

Water is essential, Tyrant, make no mistake...but it's not a nutrient. Some bottled waters may contain negligible amounts of calcuim and sodium...but what water doesn't contain (protein/carbohydrates/fats) is what excludes it from being a nutrient.

*******

A nutrient is either a chemical element or compound used in an organism's metabolism or physiology. Six nutrient groups exist and are broadly classified into those providing energy, and those used as components in the body or cellular structures. A nutrient is essential to an organism if it cannot be synthesized in the organism and must be obtained from a food source.

Substances that provide energy
Carbohydrates are compounds made up of sugars. Carbohydrates are classified by their number of sugar units: monosaccharides (such as glucose and fructose), disaccharides (such as sucrose and lactose), oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides (such as starch, glycogen, and cellulose).
Proteins are organic compounds that consists of the amino acids joined by peptide bonds. The body cannot manufacture some of the amino acids (termed essential amino acids); the diet must supply these. In nutrition, proteins are broken down through digestion back into free amino acids.
Fats consist of a glycerin molecule with three fatty acids attached. Fatty acids are unbranched hydrocarbon chains, connected by single bonds alone (saturated fatty acids) or by both double and single bonds (unsaturated fatty acids). Fats are needed to keep cell membranes functioning properly, to insulate body organs against shock, to keep body temperature stable, and to maintain healthy skin and hair. The body does not manufacture certain fatty acids (termed essential fatty acids) and the diet must supply these.
Fat has an energy content of 9 kcal/g (~37.7 kJ/g); proteins and carbohydrates 4 kcal/g (~16.7 kJ/g).

Substances that support excretion
Dietary fiber is essential for peristalsis - movement of the gut. Dietary fiber is found in barley, whole grain foods, potatoes, beans, nuts, vegetables etc. Lack of dietary fiber causes constipation - difficulty when defecating.

******

All this to say Tyrant, keep it simple, and good luck.
 

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Thanks for all the great advice guys they should make a sticky with some dieting info where you can ask questions and post meal plans and things. Thanks again guys.:thumbsup:
 

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Hey, Texas Tryant.

The older I get the less I realize I know. But at least I do know some things. (smiling)

Perhaps this that I now about to share with you might also help to you to eat right.

NURTRITION

Here is a list of those foods that I have found to contain a large percentage of protein.

1.Nuts

2.Eggs

3. Beans, soy, peas

4. Milk and Chesse

5. Poultry

6. Lean Meats

7. Fish
.


Carbohydrates: foods containing simple and/or complex carbs are:

1. Bread

2. Marcaroni, spaghetti

3. Table sugar

4. syrup

5. Cereals

6. Meals & Flours

7. Crackers

8. Potatoes
.


Those foods very rich in Vitamins are:

1. Green Vegatables

2. Oranges & Lemons

3. Butter

4. Melons

5. Tomatoes

6. Herbs

7. Bananas

8. Root Vegetables
.


The foods predominant in fat are:

1. Cream

2. Fat Meats

3. Butter

4. Nuts

5. Cooking Fats

6. Table and Salad Oils
.


Another group that cannot be overlooked are the minerals, including:

1. Shellfish

2. Apricots

3. Fluoridated Water

4. Broccoli

5. Whole Grains

6. Leafy Green Vegetables

7. Organ Meats
.


The foods giving the esstential fiber are:

1. Bran

2. Leafy Vegetables

3. Whole Wheat

4. Root Vegetables

5. Cereals

6. Fruit Pulp

.


Note that the selection is derived from fruits, vegetables, dairy products, meats, oils, cerals, and their products, fish, poultry and perserves.

This included a large selection in each respective food group, in having read Jetstar's posts above I see that he suggests to eat ONLY food that is called whole or organic foods.

I agree its better to eat organic food, but your going to be paying by far more for it compared to doing your grocery shopping at supermarket food stores.

Sometimes I do my grocery shopping at whole food stores, and buy organic food. Only, I'm not fanatical about it as some people are who eat only organic food.

Today, even many super market food stores have some organic food.

My wife calls the whole food stores: " The whole pay check stores." (smiling)

JJC
 

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In reference to my last post above!

Special care should be exercised in having the right food combinations at each meal. The various foods should blend when mixed in the stomach.

Not matter how nourishing the foods are, if you display ignorance in not combining them appropriately you will suffer in consequence.

If you wish to determine beforehand as to the foods of any meal are a satisfactory combination, imagine all these foods mixed up in a large bowel, and consider what possibilities there are of making good, rich blood from the mixture (many diesaes orginate from impurities in the blood, and the blood is manufactured from the food eaten, it stands to reason if you select healthful foods, you will more likely have healthy blood).

Do not eat all protein (muscle forming) foods at one meal.

Nor should you eat all starch or carbohdrates at any one meal.

You can easily consult the food groups given in my last post above and see that at each meal you combine proteins with starches, minerals, vitamins and so forth.

This will be a fair guide in helping you decide just how to balance your diet for maximum health and strength.

JJC
 

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JCC said:
This included a large selection in each respective food group, in having read Jetstar's posts above I see that he suggests to eat ONLY food that is called whole or organic foods.

I agree its better to eat organic food, but your going to be paying by far more for it compared to doing your grocery shopping at supermarket food stores.

JJC
Perhaps you need to re-read my posts, JCC. I never used the word organic ONCE. I also clearly said that WHOLE foods were foods that weren't overly-manufactured, preserved or refined. (i.e.: 90% of all bread procudts) This doesn't automatically make them expensive.

You make some interesting points in your listing of certain foods. I'm assuming you are listing them as sources of either protein/carbohydrates or fats?

If I assume correctly, then I might suggest to someone that milk and cheese are not a very good source of protein for this reason: they are high in lactose as well as saturated fats. Eggs, no disagreement there, but I caution people against eating too many yolks. Being that the yolk is the source of the Vitamin E, but also very high in cholesterol.

However, don't take this the wrong way, my point in response to your post is simply this:

not all foods are created equal.

For instance, there are "healthy" nuts, with essential fats in them, and then there are others which have a lot of useless and harmful fats in them.

Eating healthy might seem more expensive at first, but when one makes healthy choices (as you can attest to, based on your experience) one doesn't need to eat as much, because the food going in our bodies is doing a better job of providing us with what we need.

Agreed, some items are more expensive, but I often think that brocolli and apples are better for a body than almost any bread product out there. Both complex and simple carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals as well as fibre and essential nutrients are provided from a "whole" food.

I can't imagine in a southern climate such as Texas that a bag of apples would cost more than 3$. Brocolli, two large heads probably cost 3$, as well. A much better investment than some foods that cost exactly the same and don't do half the amount of good for the body.

As always, research is a must, and experimenting with different foods and eating regimes will ultimately allow a person to determine what works best for them.

For fighters, it would seem obvious, that based on the training, the nutritional demands as well as the requirement to "make weight", the best approach is one that will allow them to keep their strength, provide them with endurance and stamina while maintaining the flexibility the sport demands.

Texas Tyrant, another suggestion might be to look up the diets/regimes of triathletes. Short of the punching, these guys have the body types and the type of other qualities that ressemble boxers' needs pretty closely.

Keep doing your research, determine what works best for your body, and make healthy choices.

Soon, you won't have to choose, it will just be automatic, and part of your lifestyle.

Good luck!

As JCC said above, it's about balance.
 

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Jetcar said:
Perhaps you need to re-read my posts, JCC. I never used the word organic ONCE.
There was no slight intended. That is, if you take what I said as being so. That is, if you did.

I enjoy reading your posts!

Primarily, the reason I make the comments I did is only for reasons that whole foods (organic or undenatured) is growing in popularity today, and being strongly pushed and promoted.

Actually, it better to do your all grocery shopping in whole stores than to do your grocery shopping in the local supermarkets.

But its by far more expensive to do all your grocery shopping at whole foods stores.

You'll pay twice the price or even more for the same food in your local supermarkets.

But let's not forget that that's a business too.

Your grocery bill will more than double in fact will trible if you were to do all your grocery shopping in a whole food store.

The whole foods are more healthy, and better. Only, I'm not convinced that it that much better. I hope you are understanding what I'm trying to say.

You know it the funniest thing, but when in the early 1960s when I was a kid. There were even foods fads and fad diets back then too.

Someone had told me back then about all the great benefits of drinking carrot juice.

I was drinking so much carrot juice back then that I was turning orange. I mean, literally, my skin was turning orange for reasons drinking so much carrot juice.

Of course, even back then as a kid, I was very athletic and concerned about health and fitness even back at that ttime too.

It fact, I've always been very athletic and fanatical about physical conditioning since I was a kid.

Jetstar said:
I also clearly said that WHOLE foods were foods that weren't overly-manufactured, preserved or refined. (i.e.: 90% of all bread procudts) This doesn't automatically make them expensive.
As for you mention of bread!

Undoubtedly, the greatest food products condemned as lacking in the vital elements of nutrition is white bread and all white flour products, and rightly so.

In the refining process of white flour, the millers have unwisely extracted most of the important food constituents.

Most enriched white bread replaces only four of the twenty-two nutrients it originally started out with before the milling process and contains seventy-five percent less fiber than whole wheat breads. This is crime!

Along with white bread should be included such things as pies, puddings, pastry, cakes, doughnuts, muffins, cookies, biscuits and similar preparations made from white flour.

This white flour is the real part the millers should throw away for lack of nourishment.

You can not become heathly or strong by eating this product!

Whole wheat, on the other hand, has more vitamins, minerals and fiber than enriched white bread.

The whole wheat kernal contains all the essential food qualities in almost perfect proportions, however. Bread advertized as "whole wheat" must be made from 100% whole wheat flour.

Breads that are labled "cracked wheat" or "sported wheat" usually contain a large percentage of white flour.

Many 'so-called' wheat breads, for example, contain about 75% WHITE FLOUR.

So, a person should be careful to not be fooled by labels.

Any product labeled "whole wheat" must have whole wheat flour listed as the only type of flour used.

And if it doesn't you are not getting what the label is leading you to believe you are getting.

On a white flour diet, you clog the alimentary tract. The use of white bread and similar products made entirely of white flour is one of the causes of constipation.

If a person is eager to be free from this annoying condition, they have need to refrain when possible from using any foods where the base is white flour.

Fortunately, many of our breads today are fortified by addition of vitamin B-1. It is quite all right to eat such products.

Jetstar said:
You make some interesting points in your listing of certain foods.

I'm assuming you are listing them as sources of either protein/carbohydrates or fats?
I listed first those foods that I find containing a large percentage of protein.

Secondly, in the next list of foods (Carbohydrates), I listed foods containingh simple and/or complex carbs.

In the next list I listed foods that are very rich in Vitamins.

In the next list I listed foods that are predominant in fat.

Next I listed a group that are minerals.

And last I listed foods that are giving the essential fiber.

Milk and Chesse, I placed in my first list in which was listed with nuts, eggs, beans, soy, peas, poultry, lean meats and fish as being foods containing a larger percentage of proteins based on research I've done.


Research that I've done has lead me to believe that nuts, eggs, beans, soy, peas, poultry, lean meats including Milk and cheese are foods that contain a large percentage of protein.

Jetstar said:
Being that the yolk is the source of the Vitamin E, but also very high in cholesterol.
There are a lot of things that people who are in poor health can't eat, that the average normal healthy person can and that can be healthy for them to eat.

Mostly I find people that are unhealthy, often times are so due to not eating the right food, and for reasons of eating junk food, and also for reasons of lack of physical exercise, along with that of also not having a varied diet, and well balanced meals.

Eggs are good for you, drinking water is good for you.

But if you were to drink too much water it wouldn't be!

Nor, would eating too many eggs be good for you either.

We have need to have a varied diet and to not always to be eating the same food every day, and that is by far better and more healthy for the average normal healthy person.

Some today say you shouldn't eat more than three eggs a week, for reasons the egg yolk is high in cholesterol.

In other words, you could eat eggs for breakfast if you chose to do so every day, if you only eat the eggs whites and not egg yolks.

But for the normal average normal healthy person to eat an egg for breakfast is not unhealthy.

I'd would further note its a well-etablished fact that a great number of dieases may be avoided and even reversed merely by the selection of proper foods suited to the individual's requirements.

Notice that I said to the individuals requirements!

If your overweight, by cutting out the fat forming foods and exercising regularly, you will, other things being equal, become normal.

However, a person has need to be sure that their energy output is equal to or exceeds their calorie intake.

On the other hand, if underweight, a person can make considerable gains by following a well-planned dietic regime.

Its impossible to give menu lists to be observe all through life, this is why I gave a little space in an earlier post to give the information in which I did concerning foods, thereby enabling Texas Tryant to select his own wisely and carefully.

Jetstar said:
However, don't take this the wrong way, my point in response to your post is simply this:

not all foods are created equal.

For instance, there are "healthy" nuts, with essential fats in them, and then there are others which have a lot of useless and harmful fats in them.

Eating healthy might seem more expensive at first, but when one makes healthy choices (as you can attest to, based on your experience) one doesn't need to eat as much, because the food going in our bodies is doing a better job of providing us with what we need.

Agreed, some items are more expensive, but I often think that brocolli and apples are better for a body than almost any bread product out there. Both complex a

I can't imagine in a southern climate such as Texas that a bag of apples would cost more than 3$. Brocolli, two large heads probably cost 3$, as well. A much better investment than some foods that cost exactly the same and don't do half the amount of good for the body.

As always, research is a must, and experimenting with different foods and eating regimes will ultimately allow a person to determine what works best for them.

For fighters, it would seem obvious, that based on the training, the nutritional demands as well as the requirement to "make weight", the best approach is one that will allow them to keep their strength, provide them with endurance and stamina while maintaining the flexibility the sport demands.

Texas Tyrant, another suggestion might be to look up the diets/regimes of triathletes. Short of the punching, these guys have the body types and the type of other qualities that ressemble boxers' needs pretty closely.

Keep doing your research, determine what works best for your body, and make healthy choices.

Soon, you won't have to choose, it will just be automatic, and part of your lifestyle.

Good luck!

As JCC said above, it's about balance.
I would agree with this advice you gave to Texas Tyrant, and with much of what you said.

Also I would agree that whole foods (organic or undenatured foods) are better and more healthy.

I eat whole foods too.

Its only that I'm not fanatical about doing so is all, and I'm not suggesting that you are. Yet there are some or even many people today who are fanatical about it.

The reason that I'm not fanatical about eating only whole foods is only because I see no reason to be!

Just like in marketing of near every thing else today, in which people are wanting your money, there's hype used in promoting products such whole foods too, of course, that's a business too, you see.

I would say whole foods such as you would buy at whole food stores is more healthy to eat than the food mostly carried at the local supermarkets. Though many of the local supermarkets have now begin to carry some whole foods too.

I say its better, and by far more expensive too. But maybe not really all that much better as it is now being hyped to be is what I'm saying.

My wife calls the whole food supermarkets the "whole pay check stores!" (smiling)

JJC
 

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JCC, and Texas Tyrant: to sum up, from me, here it is.

Not all foods are created equal.

Cheese/milk, good sources of protein, but also high in saturated fat. If you want both, go for it.

Eggs, high in cholesterol, so skip 75% of the yolks if you want to eat lots of eggs on a regular basis. Egg whites are high in protein, and very low in fat and cholesterol. I eat two dozen egss a week ( I love them, what can I say) and only 3 yolks. My cholesterol is ACES.

Whole foods is a simple way of describing foods that are NOT processed, overly-refined, preserved, colored and laden with additives that don't occur naturally. I.e.: fruits and vegetables, nuts (be careful --lots of added salt and sugar depending on what brands), lean meats and poultry and fish.

Bread always seems to be a sticking point. It's the one time where I would use the word "organic" JCC, because, all that you describe in your last post pertaining to bread is accurate. Many manufacturers of bread are not honest. If you really want to eat bread Tyrant, I suggest making the best choice possible, and that is, organic bread from a bakery. You can be sure in buying a loaf from there that you will be getting the maximum benefit and nutrition of what bread is intended to be. The organic baker will talk your ear off about it, too, if you ask, trust me! :)

I'm not in the US, so I can't say what a whole food store is, and debate costs with you. Unrefined, unprocessed foods will always cost more, but consider this: buying the cheap food is just that...you are buying inferior nutrition, and when you think about it, what you get for your money is NO VALUE.

I'm not suggesting a radical and fanatical fad diet, either. I'm suggesting the replacement, Tyrant, of poor choices with better choices when it comes to eating.

JCC, I own a juicer, and I'm LOL at your carrot juice story. Yes, even water has a toxicity level, just like any other substance you put in your body. Have too much, and it will create an adverse effect on the body.

This is not to say that a steady diet of repetitious sources of food will have harmful effects.

A balanced approach, with moderate portions that are in context with your erergy requirements is what will be best for anyone.

All bodies are not created equal, either.

That is why I reccomend Tyrant, that you experiment with different food choices to determine what produces the best results for you.

You can't go wrong with fruits, vegetables, lean meat, poultry, fish, and whole grains (whole grain breads, rice, pasta and oats/oatmeal.)

JCC, I think we are saying two different things when we use the words "whole foods"... when you say your supermarket has just started to carry whole foods, I choke at the idea that they've only recently began to stock vegetables and fruits, egss, milk, cheese, nuts, etc etc.

I don't mean to attribute the word "whole" with "fad" or "hyped up marketing strategy".

A good example would be the difference between eating a hamburger at MCBarf's compared to one you make at home with fresh lean ground beef and herbs. While both could be called hamburgers, one has to wonder what one is actually eating when one ingests a McDonald's "hamburger"

Damn...now I'm craving a hamburger!:laugh:
 
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