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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey. I'm 16 and am considering having an amatuer bout. I have been hearing mixed opinions about whether boxers should lift weights, and how heavy. One of my trainers is worried about me becoming to 'heavy' for my weight division and fighting taller fighters with longer reach. Do you think weight training would be good? thanks.
 

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benny said:
Hey. I'm 16 and am considering having an amatuer bout. I have been hearing mixed opinions about whether boxers should lift weights, and how heavy. One of my trainers is worried about me becoming to 'heavy' for my weight division and fighting taller fighters with longer reach. Do you think weight training would be good? thanks.
Lifting weights is very bad for boxing. All of the guys that do it have horrible stamina (Briggs, Bruno, post prison Tyson). You can get muscle by doing pulls ups, push ups, etc. Stay away from the weights.
 

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Body building is bad for a boxer
Not lifting weights.
When lifting weights don’t go too heavy
But go for lots of reps.
Reps help stamina.

My old trainer gave me this simple advice
If you can max out at 200# at 10 reps
Lift 50# 75 times or until you can’t do anymore.
Ill look for my old logs and post them up.
 

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Resistence exercise includes any form of movement where resistence is put against a muscle, and the muscle is required to push or pull against the resistence.

The most common form of resistence training today is weightlifting. Maybe you have heard some refer to it in boxing as strength training today. However, in my veiw, not only is it the wrong way to exercise. It's most especially the wrong way for a boxer to exercise. It is an unnatural form of exercise. Chimpanzees, as an example, are eight times stronger than a man, yet do not lift weights.

Lifting weights can increase the size and strength of muscles ... but genenally only increases the size and strength of muscles than are seen that have aesthetic value. It does not address the majority of muscles that have no aesthetic value such as ligaments and tendons, and leaves ligaments and tendons weak.

Weight training also does not increase flexiblity --- it actually reduces flexibility, thus hindering the flow of energy through the body.

Lifting weights in my veiw is the wrong way to exercise ... strenous pulling or pushing of weights in lifting weights ... can also affect your heart, kidneys, and other vital internal organs.

Old fashion Hard calisthenics like pushups, knees bends and things such as that as well as Isometic exercises in my veiw is over all by far better than lifting weights.

It should also be realized that boxing, like many other sports ... is not all about brute strength, but skill.
 

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I lift weights, but I usually stick to low weight/high reps. If you want to lift weights don't overextend.
 

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In regards to strength training ... I read once about a guy named Danny Hodge ... who was a professional wrestler in back a lot of years ago ... who had also been prior to that a champion amateur wrestlers and had won the national title ... and later took up amateur boxing and excelled in boxing as well and was a champion and had won the national title.

He did not lift weights. Few wrestlers and boxers, few athletes exercised by lifting weights in those days. Football players didn't either.

If you were to see pictures of Danny Hodge ... you would not think imagine really just how strong he was. But did not have a musclebound physique ... but he was a very, very strong guy. And as for being a wrestler ... he was a small guy for being a wrestler. He was of average height ... not tall, and weight around about 200 pounds or less in the 190's.

He exercised by just doing old fashioned push ups, situps, knee bends and stretching exercises as well as Isometic exercises ... and this kind of thing. He especially did a lot of Isometic exercises. He did not lift weights.

He was so strong that he could break a steel pair of plyers in his hand ... that's how strong his hands were. Early I mentioned that generally exercising by lifting weights does not address the majority of muscles ... by generally only muscles that are seem that have aesthetic value. It does not address the strength of ligaments and tendons. This can create an in balance, where some muscles are strong and abnormally large, and other muscles, ligaments and tendons are weak and disportionate in size. In part, this is why I say that are for strength training doing old fashion hard calisthenics such as push ups as well as other old fashioned exercises as well as doing Isometic exercises is by far better than doing any form of exercising by lifting weights.

Much of Danny Hodges strength ... came from muscles he had that were very strong that had no aesthetic value ... it was from muscles he had that were very strong that were unseen ... having strong ligaments and tendons. And it was for reasons of the way he exercised, is why, and that gave him the strength to be able to break a steel pair of plyers in his hand. Can you who exercise by lifting weights break a steel pair of plyers in you hand? (smiling)

While I do realize this whole generation has been brain-washed to lift weights. But I don't see it as being the best way to exercise. It's an unnatural form of exercise ... and I believe it's the wrong way to exercise. I'm always impressed when I think about the fact that Chimpanzees, for example, are eight times stronger than a man, yet do not lift weights.
 

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I do weightlifting in combination with mma, so i also train boxing(it's my speciality within mma) and i don't think it makes me slower or something. But you mustn't become a powerlifter or a bodybuilder because they only have power (only the powerlifter) or muscles to show without speed, flexibility or condition. So just lift weights with many reps +25.

sorry for my bad english, i speak normally dutch.:dunno: :(

ciao meanmachin
 

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Comparing chimpanzees strength or excercise to a humans is hogwash. Yes there strength is impressive. They also have a different muscle density and structure than a humans. Its irrelevant.
Lifting weights is NOT harmful when done properly. JCC will name plenty of succesful people in many sports who never lifted weights, and thats just great. But the fact is that all of your methods of exercise that you mention are resistance training. Much the same that lifting weights is a resistance training form of exercise.
Dave made a great point above about lifting low weights in high repetitions. This can increase your strength and explosiveness without packing on size. Working with the elastic bands while shadowboxing is also a nice way to mix up your training routine, and keep your muscles guessing.
 

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This is a very interesting post, so I had to comment.

The chimpanzee argument caught my attention so I did a little research. The above poster was correct in stating that their muscles, and muscle structure is different. Also all of their body proportions do not match a humans. That pretty much kills the chimpanzee argument.

I believe every guy is different. If a guy starts boxing and really lacks any type of muscle or strength, I can see why a little weight-lifting, if done correctly, can help him.

Personally, I have found out that the boxing training (heavy bag, mitts, and even shadow boxing if done correctly) can actually add muscle mass. I also like to swim laps.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks. Ive been trying doing 3 sets of 30 instead of my normal 4 sets of 10 with weights sometimes. I've been finding its been helpful. Also, I am not a very big person, i'm 16 and 63-67 kg. So i suppose lower weights high reps is the way to go?

thanks.

Also, I rekon chimpanzees should become boxers :)
 

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A modern athlete should include resistance training in their regiment. And weight lifting is the most effective way to increase your strenght. The 'weight lifting is bad for the boxer' is nothing but the myth, and such an otdated thought is actually harmful. There is a proper way of lifting weights for every sport, including triatlon that is almost entirely aerobic. Remember, boxing is 75% anaerobic and 25% areobic.

Did you watch the video of Mike Tyson doing squats with 220lbs? E-mail me if you have further questions.
 

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what dragon says is right, but mike tyson was already a heavyweight boxer so it doesn't matter if he gets higher weight or not he stays in his class, when you increase in weight and you aren't a heavyweightboxer it can be bad for the range like already said.
 

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Well lets see, anything over 12 repitions in lifting is an endurance excercise. So your lifting is an endurance thing...WHY?!

The simple equation of power is

Strength + speed = power

You build endurance by running and doing bag/ring work. You need to work low reps to build your maximal strength. Then work with your speed strength again with lows (plyometrics, dynamic effort days, or olmypic lifting).

Who ever said lifting makes you too BIG?! How come girls who lift dont get huge? Its because they know how to diet. Ever wonder why there are so many tiny guys at the gym and lift thier butts off, cause they dont eat. Lifting makes you strong, eating makes you big, doing both builds muscle.

The only way youll become unflexible, is if you dont STRETCH. Bruce Lee lifted...was he out of shape or unflexible. Mas Oyama, founder of Kyokushin karate lifted. Mike Mahler lifted. Almsot every wrestler and MMA fighter lifts. Even at Fairtex Muay Thai Camp they lift weights. Hell even rocky balboa lifted.

PS I work at GNC and attend Kean University in the athletic training and have been training shootfighting for 3 years.
 

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El Dragon said:

A modern athlete should include resistance training in their regiment. And weight lifting is the most effective way to increase your strength.
Firstly, it should be understood what RESISTENCE EXERCISE actually is!

Resistence exercise ... isn't only exercising by lifting weights.

Though lifting weights is the most common form of resistence training today, yet that doesn't mean it's the best form of resistence training just of its popularity.

It is in part and much for reasons of marketing by those who earn their living and get rich selling that kind of stuff ... and through the power of advertizing.

What is resistence exercise?

This includes ANY FORM OF MOVEMENT WHERE RESISTENCE IS PUT AGAINST A MUSCLE, AND THE MUSCLE IS REQUIRED TO PUSH OR PULL AGAINST THE RESISTENCE.

The most common form of resistence training is weight lifting or the use of resistence machines. But that does not nescessily mean that it's the best form of resistence training a person can do. It just depends on what a person is wanting to accomplish by it is what will determines that!

If somebody is only interesting in how they look in the mirror or in a bathing suit. If that's all they are interested in and nothing else. And that's their priority then I'd say lifting weights is what they should do. Because exercising by lifting weights or exercising by using resistence machines can reshape your body and make you look great.

But it should also be realized that lifting weights and use of resistence machines is an unnatural form of exercise. Earlier, I used the example, of Chimpanzees ... being eight times stronger than a man, yet do not lift weights.

Do Chimpanzees exercise? How Chimpanzess exercise? If you exercised the way a Chimpanzee did ... you'd be strong too.

The Tiger, the leopard and the lion for a further example, with their flashing strength and power didn't get that way exercising by lifting weights and use of resistence macnines either.

How does the tiger, the leonard and the lion exercise?

By doing natural forms of exercise, not by lifting weights and using exercise machines.

If Tarzan was still alive today, he would not be lifting weights ... he'd be doing natural forms of exercise ... there were no dumbells, barbells and resistence machines where he lived out in the jungle. (smiling)

I'm trying to make this so simple to understand. Only, because through the awesome power of advertizing so many people have been brain-washed to exercise by lifting weights and by use of exercise machines. (smiling)

For a further example, as a former fighter and amateur boxing champion back in the late 1960's and early 1970's. Nor, did I get my flashing strength and power that helped to enabled me to accomlish what I did there to have won very near all my fights, and to have won more than half my fights by knockouts. I did have come to have that strength and power by lifting weights and exercising by using resistence machines.

Back in those days, mostly it was only the preening bodybuilders who were going around sneaking peeks at themselves in mirrors all the time, and weight lifters who exercised by lifting weights, not fighters ... boxers did not exercise by lifting weights.

It just depends on what your exercise goals are that determines the way you should exercise.

I built my body and increased in strength by doing simple and natural forms of exercises since I was nine years old, doing calisthenics, stretching, and Isometics exercises. And I still do those exercises daily to this day.

Even now at age 56, I just had a birthday a few days ago ... at 5' 10". I still have a slender, lean body at 168 lbs that's still all muscle and bone. I can still do a 100 push ups non stop before I begin to tire. That's not so bad for an older man my is it?

As for natural strength ... I can pick up a 200 pound man and walk off with him. I'm not a wrestler .. I'm a former fighter. But I have and do at times do some wrestling at a local YMCA at times just for fun and exercise and I know how to wrestle too.

I took up amateur wrestling at a local YMCA after I stopped boxing amateur years ago just for exercise and for fun. And as for strength even today, I can and have over powered man out there on the mat who have been much bigger than I and to have weight more than 200 pounds.

There can be different kinds of strengths ... my strength and power has not come from exercising by lifting weights or using resistence machines.

In my veiw, lifting weights or using resistence machines is the wrong way to exercise. And in having done much research on exercising over the years I also came to see that strenous exercise that involves lifting weights or using resistence machines can affect your heart. kidneys, and other vital internal organs.

I knew of a guy some years ago who was a body builder. He was short ... only 5'6" but had a great looking physique ... and had won some bodybuilding contests when he was younger. He stopped competing as he got older ... but still looked great and had a great physique, and continued to keep his body built up exercising by lifting weights.

Eventually, however, he came to have increasing health problems as he grew older, and had to recieve a kidney transplant ... and he lived for a few years after that and died. He really wasn't all that old a man when he died either. I believe his continued exercising by lifting weights over a prolonged period of time may had lead to trouble with his kidneys ... and to not fully function and not function properly.

This was long before body builders and athletes began taking drugs (body enhancement and steriods which is an unnatural way to build the body also and can lead to health problems even pre-mature death).

People can chose to exercise any way they want to exercise. But I always believe that natural forms of exercise is always over all better if all-natural the way one choses to exercise for health, strength and physique.

El Dragon said:

The weight lifting is bad for the boxer' is nothing but the myth, and such an outdated thought is actually harmful.


[/QUOTE=El Dragon]

If you believe that you should exercise by lifting weights. But I do not believe that! That's why I do not exercise by lifting weights. Actually, the opposite of what you said I believe. I believe that exercising by lifting weights can ruin a fighter.

El Dragon said:

Did you watch the video of Mike Tyson doing squats with 220lbs?
Mike Tyson did not exercise by lifting weights until after his conviction ... and he sent to prison for raping a woman.

It was in prison that he started exercising by lifting weights.

In prison ... not much to do there they tell me ... but to lift weights or read books, or get in trouble. Tyson apparnetly chose to lift weights. (smiling)

Tyson has been bad for boxing.

As a former fighter and as a fight fan ... and as one who loves the sport ... especially I did in my time there.

I'm a ashamed of Tyson.

If I was a youngster ... seeking to emulate someone it would not be Mike Tyson.

Now he's going to court soon again on a drug charges. If convicted he may get up to seven and half years in prison I'd told.

If so he's be some 50 years old by the time he gets out, and if he choses to spend his time exercising by lifting weights while he's there ... no doubt he may even be more musclebound when he get's out.

Mike Tyson has been bad for boxing.

I'm told he's a man-child, he has not self-control. He's the kind of person that requires close and strict supervion.

He can't control any thing, especially not himself. He requires close and strict supervisor or he gets in trouble.

Tyson is not a person I look up to or have respect for ... and certianly not a person I would want to emulate I can sure tell you that I do know.
 

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Everyone is entitled on their own opinion on this forum. And your description of your (JCC) abilities are impressive, for a guy of any age ;>)

However it's up to athlete and their trainer to decide the best suited training program, for their particular needs.

I would strongly suggest book: "Coaching Olympic Style Boxing" for anyone, serious about competative boxing.
From conditioning, plyometrics, strenght and basic strategies this book covers all to get you started.

Remember there is a good way to train, better and BEST way. You pick the winner!
 

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Well, let's just say that I'm a former fighter and champion amateur boxer of the 1960s and early 1970s that didn't stop training and exercising regularly and got fat and out of shape and became unhealthy like most had and have after I spent my time there from age nine and in my teens and early twenties ... and then came to have interest in others things more relating to a much bigger arena in being a fighter ... in the arena of life. There I'm still a fighter! (smiling)

As for training and exercising, you can come to know a lot about something if you've been doing it for more than 40 years. It also allows you to see through all the B.S. too. And there is an aweful lot of it out the today being peddled by people promoting exercise machines and gadgets, as well as exercise courses.

Oh, yeah, must not forget supplements. They peddle that stuff too.

But I'm not saying none of it can't do you any good. But as for most this kind of stuff being peddled today for profit. I find that it's mostly a lot of B.S.

But there is a positive side to it, in being at least it does get some people started.
 

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You'll get no argument out of me on that one JCC. Everywhere you look someone is trying to sell people on their latest fitness gadget.
When it comes down to it, you get out of something what you put into it. There is no substitute for hard work.
 

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First off, let me state that I am new to boxing. I have been training for only 6 monthes, and have yet to step into the ring. I train 4 to 5 days a week. We start off by a 20 minute warm up, followed by 3 rounds of skipping and a combination of push ups, squats, and sit ups in between rounds. We then switch to about 6 rounds with the heavy bags, which can be a combination of speed rounds and power rounds. We end the class with a round of skipping, a round of polish, and a round of shadow boxing. Now, two days a week we dont hit the bags, and we work the medicine balls. I suppose this works those 'other' muscles that dont get touched through regular weight training.

The class usually lasts an hour and a half. After that, I do 45 minutes of weight training. Im training to gain some muscle, so I've upped it to max weight, with 8 reps, and 1 to 3 sets depending on the excercise. I really wanted to bulk up, as well as lose fat for about 8 weeks, then I was going to switch to high repetition, and low weight, in order to tone and define, as well as build stamina.

Can anyone tell me if this is an appropriate way to go about this? I plan on boxing amateur by the end of this year.
 

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Wow guys, this is a great forum. I literally signed up so I could ask this question, and it's the top post in the forum this morning. Perfect!

My worry is that I'm coming off 3-4 years of strength training to start boxing. My endurance is so so, but my power, I think, is pretty good. My biggest worry is that I'd lose my strength and muscle mass in exchange for endurance, but from what some of you are saying, I can continue to strength train. I have no intentions of training strength for additional gains, but I was going to try to keep a maintenance regimen of probably 2 days a week on the weights. I was planning on omitting legs from my strength routine as I seemingly can't afford to have my legs stiff in any way during training. Does that seem sane to everybody here?

Nice to meet you guys by the way. I'll post an introduction in the general section in just a minute.
 
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