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Hey I have this product cratine monohydrate from now sports that i bought at the natural food store a long time ago. Has anyone had any experience with this? its the powder one.

Also, instead of starting another threaddoes anyone know of any good fatburners? the reason i ask is because I have been dieting (not great but dieting) and working out and cant seem to get rid of my belly fat I also do 100 pushups on Mon/Wed/Fri and have noticed and increase in my arms but not my chest but i think maybe the fat covers it up? I would be a little more motivated if I could see better results faster:(
 

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Texas Tyrant said:
Hey, I have this product cratine monohydrate from now sports that I bought at the natural food store a long time ago.

Has anyone had any experience with this? its the powder one.
I haven't!

Just have balanced meals, three balanced meals a day, I find to be sufficent.

In addition to that I think its good to take a multi-Vitamin and Mineral supplement.


Texas Tyrant said:
Also, instead of starting another threaddoes anyone know of any good fatburners?

The reason I ask is because I have been dieting (not great but dieting) and working out and cant seem to get rid of my belly fat.

I also do 100 pushups on Mon/Wed/Fri and have noticed and increase in my arms but not my chest.

But I think maybe the fat covers it up?

I would be a little more motivated if I could see better results faster:
I've never believed in quick fixes, and don't ever recommend quick fixes.

Only, hard work is all I recommend.

I still train and workout daily much the same way as I did when I was boxing.

Only, not quite as strenously as I did back when I was still boxing.

Mornings, I still do my road work (running) usually 2 1/2 to 3 miles a day.

I workout daily also in the gym at my home. I don't lift weights. In the evenings, I workout for an hour and a half doing hard, or intense calisthenics, stretching, and resistence exercises.

You mentioned pushups. Pushups are a great exercise to do. I can do a 100 pushups fairly easily before I begin to tire. Pushups are one the exercises that I do every day.


JJC
 

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Texas Tyrant said:
Hey I have this product cratine monohydrate from now sports that i bought at the natural food store a long time ago. Has anyone had any experience with this? its the powder one.

Also, instead of starting another threaddoes anyone know of any good fatburners? the reason i ask is because I have been dieting (not great but dieting) and working out and cant seem to get rid of my belly fat I also do 100 pushups on Mon/Wed/Fri and have noticed and increase in my arms but not my chest but i think maybe the fat covers it up? I would be a little more motivated if I could see better results faster:(
Creatine Monohydrate is a recovery supplement. I don't reccomend too much of this, if you aren't "breaking down your muscles" the way a bodybuilder would with static weightlifting excercises. These movements create tiny tears in the tissue, and when they heal, give the muscle the increase in size as a result.
However, regular non-resistance training (such as push ups, dips and pull-ups) won't give you those type of results per se. You will see an increase in triceps size, as well as the chest, but it won't shape it the way you are hoping for. Creatine can be obtained via chemical synthesis using plant-derived amino acids, and that's likely what you have in that powder of yours. Eat lean red meats and fish if you want natural sources of creatine.

Your muscles are all there, under the body fat, depedning on how much body fat you are carrying.

Do some excercise that revolves around fat burning (i.e.: calesthenics, jogging, jump rope, cycling, swimming) if you want to burn fat from your body.

Consistency is the key. JCC said it best...doing a morning run will have excellent results towards your goal of better stamina/endurance as well as melting off the pounds.

If you have strong knees (like JCC, obvisouly, if he still runs everyday at his age, and his been, since his youth) then running is great. There are other lower-impact activities that can burn a lot of fat as well, such as swimming, cycling and different cardio machines.

Join a gym (boxing or fitness) if you haven't already, and reach out to some other people. It always helps to have like-minded people to keep you motivated in your life on a regular basis.

Sort of like this boxing forum. :thumbsup:
 

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Jetcar said:
... regular non-resistance training (such as push ups, dips and pull-ups) won't give you those type of results per se.

You will see an increase in triceps size, as well as the chest, but it won't shape it the way you are hoping for.
If Texas Tryant's interest is in having a musclebound physique of a body builders that lift weights? I would agree. But that kind of training is no good for a boxer.

On the other hand, if his interest is in have an athletic build, and to have a natural body, that's muscular and a great natural body and physique that can be achieved without lifting weights.

If a person's interest is in having that kind of body, I would recommend an exercise course that have been developed for that intended purpose.

If someone is wanting to be strong and to have a great natural body and physique?

The exercise course I would recommend is an exercise course that was the most popular exercise on the market in the 1940s and 1950s: The Charles Atlas exercise course.

That exercise course (the updated version of that exercise course) is still available and being marketed to this day.

I had taken the Charles Atlas exercise course when I was a kid in my early teens in the early 1960s.

It was a great exercise course!

Many of the exercises the Charles Atlas exercise course I still do to this day, in my daily workouts.

Resistance exercises are taught in that exercise course as well as in the up dated version of that course for muscular development and to increase the size and strength of muscles without lifting weights or use if resistence machines and those kind of exercises are good also for boxers.

However, that kind of physical training will not produce those kind of musclebound physiques with huge bulging muscles that are seen in the muscle magazines.

But will build a great natual body and physique without the use of weights or lifting weights.

Boxers never use to lift weights, however. There are some today who do lift weights.

But mostly the trainers today who do prescribe lifting weights today to boxers are trainers who have never boxed.

But for my part, at least I'm not an advocate of lifting weights for boxers.

Jetstar said:

Your muscles are all there, under the body fat, depending on how much body fat you are carrying.
Texas Tryant, has said in his posts that he's 22 years old, has a martial arts back ground, and recently came to have interest in boxing, and had taken up boxing a month ago. And that he will have his first fight in a few months.

It takes time to get in shape. Time will take care of this problem if he will train hard, and knows how to train, and is training right, and eating the right food.

Jetstar said:

Do some excercise that revolves around fat burning (i.e.: calesthenics, jogging, jump rope, cycling, swimming) if you want to burn fat from your body.
I agree.

Jetstar said:

Consistency is the key.

JCC said it best...doing a morning run will have excellent results towards your goal of better stamina/endurance as well as melting off the pounds.
Your right!

A fighter (boxer) should be getting out there a that break of dawn doing his road work (running) daily.

That becomes even more important if he's in training for an up coming fight!

The great and legendary Rocky Marciano who is my most favorite fighter, had once said that if you'll get out there at the break of dawn ever day and get your road work in and run up and down hills you'll be able to go 40rounds without getting tired.

Marciano would get out there at the break of dawn and run 7-8 miles every day, even in between fights he did.

When in training for a fight, he'd train even harder he'd run 9-10 miles a day in the mornings.

And a few weeks before the fight he'd increase that to running 15 miles or more a a day.

He was exceptional as for the way he drove himself in training, and while the experts will disagree on many things about Rocky Marciano, they all seem to agree that he was the most well-conditioned heavyweight in the the history of boxing.

In his prime in the 1950s, many believed that Marciano was not only the most well-conditioned heavyweight, but also the most well-conditioned professional athlete in the world.

If your a boxer, and you don't have the nescessary stamina, you are going to get a royal-butt kick out there.

Two minutes rounds in the amatuer rounds can seen forever especially if you lack stamina, and as for the professional ranks the three minutes rounds seem forever!

Those who had never boxed really don't know how long those three or even two minutes rounds can be out there unless they have done it.

It came seen forever!

Especially, if your not in shape for it!

Throwing punches can tire you, and and getting hit with punches can tire you too.

Boxing is a gruelling sport and in order to make it to the late rounds, and even more so especially in the professional ranks for the rounds are longer, and you also go more rounds. a fighter must be in shape for it.

A fighter is in peak condition for the night of the fight in the ring when that first bell rings in beginning the first round of the fight.

In the amatuer ranks the rounds are two minutes in the professional ranks the rounds are longer they are three minutes.

Then its an alternating cyle of two minute rounds in the amatuer ranks, three minutes in the professional ranks in which the fighter gets his first test in the beginning in the first round.

Then its an alternating cycle of exertion followed by the precious sixty seconds rest in between each round in his corner to recover.

With every round more energy is spent and less is recovered until the fighter is pushed to the very limit.

Jetstar said:

If you have strong knees (like JCC, obvisouly, if he still runs everyday at his age, and his been, since his youth) then running is great.
In seeing how so many people today have health problems I consider myself very fortunate in being I don't and never really have had any health problems.

Nor, to have ever suffered any serious injuries at any time boxing all the years I was there either.

I took up boxing at age 9, in 1960, and fought in competition in the juniors, by the late 1960s in the amatuer ranks as I got older a middleweight in the late 1960s, and later as a light heavyweight in the early 1970s, I never suffered any serious injuries.

I was very fortune I think, for in those days, in the amatuer ranks in contests we did not wear head gear as they do today, and we also wear the smaller 8 ounce gloves.

Today, in the amateur ranks, they wear the larger 12 and 14 ounce gloves which can make for more a little difference in punching power, and there were more fights won in the amatuer ranks by knockouts back in those days.

For reasons of some things you said, I want to share this with you that I found quite interesting a recent article I read in the morning newspaper.
.

...........

Thursday, January 25, 2007

ATHLETE

MAKING HER RUN FOR A DREAM

Gillian Brewer began running marathona at age 55. Next month, she'll run in Antarctica.


By Traci Shurley (Fort Worth Star Telegram)

ARLINGTON, Texas --- Since taking up marthon training in her 50s, Gillian Brewer has run along the Great Wall of china and on Australia's Gold Coast.

Soon she'll compete on a glacier.

In February, when runners in Fort Worth are suiting up for the Cowtown Marathon, the Arlington nurse will be on King George Island just off the Antarctic Peninsula, running a race that will put her one step closer to joining a race that will out her one step closer to joining the Seven Continents Club.

The club has 176 members worldwide and is made up of people who have run a marathon on each continent, according to its Web site.

Running 26.2 miles
where tempertures average 15 degrees to 30 degrees and winds can reach as high as 30 mph ....

............


WOW, that great that at her age, she's still very athlete and keeps herself in peak physical condition.

As for getting out there in the mornings and doing your roadwork, if your a boxer, especially if you were run up and down hills.

This is a great stamina builder, and great for strengthening your legs.

Another reason that is important is because in a fight, a contest, when a boxer begins to tire, usually the first thing that will go out on him is his legs.

If you have weak knees, or problems with your legs, you can't be a boxer.


Jetstar said:

There are other lower-impact activities that can burn a lot of fat as well, such as swimming, cycling and different cardio machines.

Join a gym (boxing or fitness) if you haven't already, and reach out to some other people. It always helps to have like-minded people to keep you motivated in your life on a regular basis.

Sort of like this boxing forum.
I agree.

JJC
 

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Yeah I have read it all. It was alot of info but it was all good it just sucks because the past few days I have been sick and havent done **** but lay in bed I think Ill go to the gym anyway tonight though
 

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im new to the forums... but not new to boxing. been boxing a little more than 2 years since when i was almost 15 till now when im 17.

i have learned a lot since i started. i once used creatine supplements for a while to give me some added energy. i find that they do work for energy during workouts, but when i consulted my trainer about it, he told me they arent meant for boxers, only for weight lifters.

i have been reading a lot of your posts JCC and you seem like a very respectable old time boxer. i have some questions for u as someone basically just starting out.

1) can you tell me more things about rocky marciano's training program, or give me a link about his training, the way he works out intrigues me, and i certainly have the work ethic to acheive training as him.

2) i do mostly chinups, pushups and dips, and punching with 5-10 pound weights as well as a lot of situps and neck excersizes, but i also do a little bit of weights once a week or so. not much just some bench press or today i did a few reps of curls. do you think doing even a little bit of weight training will affect my performance as a boxer? because i really dont do it a lot at all, and just recently picked it up after about a year of only calisthetics.

3) how was your career as a boxer? did you turn pro or get far in your amatuer career?

and yeah thats about it for now, thank you
 

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g00dz said:

I have been reading a lot of your posts JCC and you seem like a very respectable old time boxer.
Well, I like hearing those compliments. (smiling)

Your too kind.

gOOdz said:

I have some questions for you as someone basically just starting out.

1) Can you tell me more things about Rocky Marciano's training program, or give me a link about his training, the way he works out intrigues me, and I certainly have the work ethic to acheive training as him.

2) I do mostly chinups, pushups and dips, and punching with 5-10 pound weights as well as a lot of situps and neck excersizes, but I also do a little bit of weights once a week or so.

Not much just some bench press, or today I did a few reps of curls.

Do you think doing even a little bit of weight training will affect my performance as a boxer?

Because I really don't do it a lot at all, and just recently picked it up after about a year of only calisthetics.

3) How was your career as a boxer?

Did you turn pro or get far in your amatuer career?
First, I would just like to welcome you to this boxing forum.

I would be happy to answer all your questions.

I try to limit my posts to only one page, for reasons that I really don't like to make long posts and I tend to believe most people don't like to read long posts.

To answer you questions I'm going start another thread, and call it "The Brockton Block Buster" Rocky Marciano.

A little later as I have more time to post, I'll start this new thread and I'll put your questions and offer my answers to your questions there.

The Rock didn't lift weights!

I'll begin to explain the ways Rocky trained and reveal the secret of his power and his amazing stamina in my next post, and also what contributed to his awesome punching power.

Be watching for the new thread, I'll offer my answers to your questions there.

In the words, of the Rock, "Keep punching, kid." ;)

JJC
 

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Decided to not to start a new thread for this ...

g00dz said:

I'm new to the forums... but not new to boxing. been boxing a little more than 2 years since when i was almost 15 till now when im 17.
That's great!


How many fights have you had, and what weight class?

gOOdz said:

I have learned a lot since I started.

I once used creatine supplements for a while to give me some added energy.

I find that they do work for energy during workouts, but when I consulted my trainer about it.

He told me they aren't meant for boxers, only for weight lifters.

I have been reading a lot of your posts JCC and you seem like a very respectable old time boxer.
Again, thanks for the compliment!

gOOdaz said:

I have some questions for you as someone basically just starting out.

1) Can you tell me more things about Rocky Marciano's training program, or give me a link about his training, the way he works out intrigues me, and I certainly have the work ethic to achieve training as him.
Rocky Marciano is a little before my time, none the less I have long since greatly admired the Rock, after I came to learn a lot about him.

I remember a couple of years ago, hearing about a fighter (boxer) named Mike Marrone, from Vero Beach, Florida, who was greatly inspired by Rocky Marciano, and came to thrive on the Rocky's inspiration and to absolutely idolize him after he read Everett M. Skehan's 1977 book entitled Rocky Marciano: Biography of a First Son.

And a couple years back, I heard Mike Marrone was doing real good, he was winning every thing down in Flordia.

Also the former middleweight champion of the world Marvalous Marvin Hagler is another fighter that I know of that was greatly inspired and thrived of Rocky's inspiration too.

I've read the book, it a great book about Rocky Marciano.

By the way that same author has since come out with another book since in 2004 entitled UNDEFEATED ... ROCKY MARCIANO .. The Fighter Who Refused to Lose.

Basically, it's just a spin off of his last book the same, only he'd added a little more to it that wasn't in his last book.

I would recommend that book to you!

If your a fan of the Rock? That book was great inspire you are a fighter!

There is also another book about the Rock that you may would really enjoy reading that it's Russell Sullivan's 2005 book entitled ROCKY MARCIANIO .. "The ROCK OF HIS TIMES."

I've read that book also! Its a great book!

The Rock has long since been an inspiration to me too.

In fact, in the gym at my home I have a picture of Rocky Marciano on the wall, for inspiration to be fit and to stay in shape.

I'm not a boxer any more, but I still workout daily to stay in shape.

As for the way Rocky trained?

Accurately, just trained like all fighters did bascially, in his day, and the way I did also in my time time in the 1960s and early 1970s.

Only, Rocky trained much harder than other fighters.

Rocky continued his training daily even in between fights, only not as strenously as he did when he training for an up coming fight.

At times he had always tended to over train at times too. And it would affect his performance in the ring. But he never lost any fights in the professional ranks, and he's the only heavyweight champion of the world to have ever completed a professional career without a loss (49-0 losses, with 43 knockouts).

As for the way Rocky trained, he basically trained just like all other fighters trained as for the ways he trained.

Other than the usual things that all fighters did, like doing his roadwork (running) daily in the morning at the break of dawn.

He also liked to hit tire with a baseball bat.

He'd climb a hill with a bag of sand on his shoulders.

He also liked to run up hills, and to go backwards back down hills.

And to repeatedly to do that over and over, to strengthen his legs and to build his stamina.

He also liked to go for very long walks in the evenings to build his stamina.

He also liked to jump in a pool or a lake and to start punching and running aerobics under water.

gOOdz said:

2) I do mostly chinups, pushups and dips, and punching with 5-10 pound weights as well as a lot of situps and neck excersizes, but I also do a little bit of weights once a week or so. not much just some bench press or today I did a few reps of curls. do you think doing even a little bit of weight training will affect my performance as a boxer? because I really don't do it a lot at all, and just recently picked it up after about a year of only calisthetics.
I'm not an advocate of lifting weights for boxers.

Mostly the only trainers today that perscribe lifting weights to boxers are trainers that have never boxed, and wanna be boxers who have been unsuccessful in boxing.

Experienced fight trainers are all ex-fighters, and they near all still perscribe old school training to their fighters.


gOOdz said:

3) How was your career as a boxer?

Did you turn pro or get far in your amatuer career?
I think I tend to talk about myself too much in my posts. Perhaps I should be ashamed of it. (smiling)

My father was a fighter, I grew up in boxing.

As best I remember, it was either in late 1959, or in 1950, that I had first taken up boxing at local boys club.

It was there that I got my start in boxing.

I fought in the juniors, and had a lot of kid fights.

In my first the first tourament, in what they called inner city fights I won the state title (Texas), in my weight class, and left the novices ranks and enter the open-class ranks after that and was always an open-class fighter also that for the remainer of my amatuer boxing career.

Not sure how many fights I had all total in the juniors, but they were many, and I just remember only having lost two fights in the juniors.

Actually, I was too young to fight in the juniors when I first starting boxing at age 9. You had to be at least 12 years old to fight in the juniors. But because if who my father was, they let me fight despite the fact I was under age.

I won a very near every inner city tourament fights I ever entered in the juniors.

As I grew older, later in the late 1960s in my teens in the amatuer ranks I was boxed as a middleweight, and in my early twenties in the early 1970s, I was boxed as light heavyweight.

As best I can remember I had 36 inner city fights, lost only one fight, and 19 knockouts.

I think I did pretty good.

I won a lot trophies and stuff, and won titles in every weight class I had ever fought in.

Other than that I had some exhibitions bouts too. Maybe 10, as best I can remember.

I had some ambition to turn pro, but got married in my early twenties and my wife don't want me to keep fighting so I quit boxing in the early 1970s.

Some of the guys I grew up with boxing in the amatuer ranks did turn pro in the very late 1960s and early 1970s. But none of them that did really stayed all that long, maybe a couple of years there.

You have to really be salty, and tough to turn pro, and most especially so back in those days, and even before my time there too. For boxing as a sport wasn't like it is today. Back in those days boxing was by far more popular that it is today, and attracted more talented athletes than it does today.

JJC
 

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Hey thanks for replying to my questions. I box in the world famous gleason's gym in brooklyn NY. (at least i think its world famous) im 5'9'' and all my of 4 fights so far have been in the 125 weight class, but i have begun to gain a bit more weight and may start fighting at 132.

ive had 4 fights so far with a record of 1-3-0 (1 KO)... though i thnk i should have won all of them and got robbed... but its okay because amatuers are just a learning experience. if you wish to see them i have em uploaded on youtube =]

sounds like you have had a very fulfilling amatuer career JCC, and a big congratulations for that. i hope mine can one day become like yours. you sound like you were a good fighter... if you turned pro who knows what could have happened =D

im definitely buying one of the marciano books you have submitted to me, i think i can gain valuable information of improving my training while learning about one of the greatest fighters of all time.

i actually used to do a lot of weights before i started boxing, and once i started i basically dropped everything and switched to chinups, pushups, dips, situps and other such. i am known by some people as the chinup man in my gym =] i used to do sets of 20 chinups and 20 dips till i reached 100 reps per day of both, and two sets of 50 pushups. after a while when i started sparring more and more, i realized i was tiring my body so much and it was hurting my sparring performance, which i think cna be more valuable than so much working out. so now i usually do 40 pushups, 40 dips and 100 pushups. (2 sets of 50) per day and 500 straight situps.

on saturdays, which is the last day of my workout week (take sunday off usually for light working out and running), i'll do the old 100 chinups 100 dips.

usually everyday i will take a 8 pound dumbells or 10 pound dumbells and punch with them and shadowbox... which i think is a great way to increase strength and speed. everybody else i see does it with 2-4 pound weights, and im doing more than double that so i know im getting somewhere.
 

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g00dz said:

Hey thanks for replying to my questions.

I box in the world famous gleason's gym in brooklyn NY. (at least i think its world famous) im 5'9'' and all my of 4 fights so far have been in the 125 weight class, but i have begun to gain a bit more weight and may start fighting at 132.

ive had 4 fights so far with a record of 1-3-0 (1 KO)... though i thnk i should have won all of them and got robbed... but its okay because amatuers are just a learning experience. if you wish to see them i have em uploaded on youtube.
I'll watch them. Are they under the same name your using here?

gOOdz said:

Sounds like you have had a very fulfilling amatuer career JCC, and a big congratulations for that.

I hope mine can one day become like yours. You sound like you were a good fighter... if you turned pro who knows what could have happened.
It was either that I was good at it, or the guys I fought weren't either one of the other. But I'd like to think that I was good at it. (smiling)

As for your mention of maybe getting some bad decisions, no doubt that happens sometimes.

When the other guy gets the decision, and especially if it's a split decision it can make you wonder sometimes.

When I lost a fight it just made me train harder.

But you got to be in shape both mentally, as well as to be in shape physically to perform your best.

I think I finished good much for reasons that near the end especially I was often, or usually by far more experienced than near all my opponents for reasons I had started boxing at such a very young age.

It's what you know that makes you a good fighter.

It's what you know that makes you tough and hard to beat.

I don't think I was really good, or all that tough and hard to beat until I neared the end of my time there.

There's much to know. There's much to learn.


gOOdz said:

I'm definitely buying one of the Marciano books you have submitted to me, I think I can gain valuable information of improving my training while learning about one of the greatest fighters of all time.
Of the books I mentioned the one I'd most recommend is Everett M. Skehan's 2004 book "UNDEFEATED."

I found it to be the most inspirating of the books I'd read about Rocky Marciano.

You'll want to read it again and again after you've read it.

I think every youngster who has interest in becoming a fighter, or who is a fighter ought to read that book no matter if they are young or old.


gOOdz said:

I actually used to do a lot of weights before I started boxing, and once I started I basically dropped everything and switched to chinups, pushups, dips, situps and other such.
Some believe that if they weight lifts and have big muscles that will increase their punching power.

But lifting weights and having big muscles is not what generates punching power.

What generates punching power is leverage, speed and timing.

I want to put this in your mind: Its not how hard you hit your opponent, but how many times you hit him.


gOOdz said:

I'm known by some people as the chinup man in my gym. I used to do sets of 20 chinups and 20 dips till I reached 100 reps per day of both, and two sets of 50 pushups.

After a while when I started sparring more and more, I realized I was tiring my body so much and it was hurting my sparring performance, which I think can be more valuable than so much working out.
If you over train, it will affect your performance in the ring.

If you over train for a fight? You'll leave your punch in the gym.

Train hard, but be careful not to over train.

For that can be just as bad as not training hard enough.

When you train, especially if you are exercising daily. Better to do an exercise until you begin to tire, but not to exhaustion.

The idea is to train, not strain.

As your body progressively grows stronger and more well-conditioned the number of times you perform an excercise will by a natural response increase.

Many injuries in training could be avoided if people would not push their bodies on a regular basis to complete exhaustion in performing an exercise.


gOOdz said:

So now I usually do 40 pushups, 40 dips and 100 pushups. (2 sets of 50) per day and 500 straight situps.

On Saturdays, which is the last day of my workout week (take sunday off usually for light working out and running), I'll do the old 100 chinups 100 dips.

Usually everyday I will take a 8 pound dumbells or 10 pound dumbells and punch with them and shadowbox... which I think is a great way to increase strength and speed.

Everybody else I see does it with 2-4pound weights, and in doing more than double that so I know im getting somewhere.
Do what you feel comfortable doing. But I found that using one or two pound hand weights to be better.

Try it for a couple of couple of weeks, and I believe you'll come to see it will work better for you in increasing your hand speed than using those five and ten pound hand weights.

Do lot's and lot's of shadow boxing.

You need to be shadow boxing every day.

JJC
 

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all my fights on youtube are under the name "g00dz", yes.

i have read everything you said and i will use it to make myself a better fighter lol.

i used to overtrain, and my trainer told me this, which is why i toned it down a little. sometimes i get the urge to pick it back up again =]
 

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g00dz said:
All my fights on youtube are under the name "g00dz", yes.
I'll see if I can find them.


gOOdz said:
I have read everything you said, and I will use it to make myself a better fighter.
When it comes to training, many people differ and have their own idea about what is best for them to do in training.

You should do only what you feel comfortable to do and what you believe is best for you to do is training.

Training for a fighter, should be designed specfically for each individual person.

Of the the course, as for the basics they are all the same or should be as for as doing your roadwork (running) every day, and sparring and things such as that.

But in other ways, training should be designed differently for each individual person to improve themselves for not all have the same weaknesses, and all do have weaknesses every body does.

You should only do things you feel comfortable with and that comes more natural to you, for you can't be someone else, you can only be yourself.

gOOdz said:
I used to overtrain, and my trainer told me this, which is why I toned it down a little.

Sometimes I get the urge to pick it back up again.
The next time you are tempted to over train, if you have a tendency to do so.

Just remember the fights you lost, and it may help you to heed your trainers warning about it.

Of course, you want to train hard, but to just be careful not to over train is all.

If you over train, you'll get stale, and you'll leave your punch in the gym.

JJC
 

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g00dz said:
all my fights on youtube are under the name "g00dz", yes.
For people like myself, who can't figure out YouTube searches (don't ask, I know how lame that sounds) can you post some links on here to make it easy?

K Thanx:thumbsup:
 

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if your talking about creatine monohydrate in general yea it does work good but one thing u gotta remember is that you still have to train hard but yes its a good way to gain muscle mass
 
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