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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, I'm new to this forum and very, very new to boxing. So new I haven't started yet, but I had a question for you guys.

It may seem like a no brainer, but here's some background first.

I've been working out in a gym (combined cardio and lifting) workouts for a year and eight months now. I went from well over 30% body fat to where I am now at 11%. My goal is to get to 8% as soon as possible, but right now I'm just maintaining until Ramadan (my religious fast) is over in about three weeks. However, upon returning to losing body fat, I'm not looking forward to going back to the gym; it has become very monotonous and uninteresting, and I'm ready to pick up a sport. I have been conditioning my body to become very athletic over the past almost two years (In my past, I have consistenly been working out between 2/days five days/week up to 4/days 7 days/week).

So, starting Oct 10 I want to start boxing, but I only want to do it if I can get to 8% or lower if I train under a REAL trainer and a REAL program (not some adult fitness class bullshit) 5 days/week paired with 5-6 small meals of clean foods in a calorie deficit. Also, I'll lift if I have to, but to my understanding boxing routines take care of that.

Anyway, what do you guys think? Can I use boxing (4-5 day/week, probably 5) and good diet as a catalyst to get to 8% (or lower) body fat?

After I get to my bodyfat goal, I want to focus on becoming the best boxer I can be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Awesome! Thanks a lot for the feedback.

So, I've read elsewhere that boxing trainers don't allow weight lifting, and that weight lifting isn't preffered when boxing. Is this true? When I start boxing will there be a need/want to continue my weight training?
 

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That will be up to you , and what your goals are. Lifting isnt really "necessary" and traditionally hasnt been the course of action for many boxers. That being said, theres no reason why you cant incorporate the correct type of weight lifting regimen as well.
If you do decide to continue to lift weights while your on your boxing workout schedule, I highly recommend performing lower weight-high rep exercises and explosive plyometric exercises.

You can find mor einfo on the subjest by using the search function of the forums and looking up weight lifting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks again!

To be honest, I'd rather have weight lifting be taken care of by calisthenics during the boxing training session. I'm not the biggest fan of lifting weights. If I do continue to lift, I'll probably keep it at a 4x/week max. And yeah, it'd probably be explosive movements, i'm not interested in getting any bigger.
 

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If youre not a fan of weight lifting, then just leave it behind. Body weight exercises, aswell as the boxing training itself (punching the bag, etc.) should give you all the power you need, plus speed, agility and stamina.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pepe said:
If youre not a fan of weight lifting, then just leave it behind. Body weight exercises, aswell as the boxing training itself (punching the bag, etc.) should give you all the power you need, plus speed, agility and stamina.
Sounds perfect. I'm a fan of bodyweight exercises, and they've always been the only weight-lifting exercises that make sense to me. I mean, the stronger the better, but if you don't want to invest all your time into being able to lift 500+ lbs, you should at least be able to lift your body weight. Lucky for me, i'm 170, so there's a lot of weight to lift.

I start boxing training Oct 10th. Anyone have any advice for me?

Also, as you all probably know i'm using boxing primarily to get to 8% bodyfat from 11%. Of course, however, I want to become a good boxer, as i'll stick with it indefinately. Is it realistic to try to get to 8% using 5x/week of boxing and a good diet plan (clean foods every three hours as I said earlier) by christmas?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
PrettyBoyFloyd said:
That is highly likely. You will find that boxing will be the best workout you have ever been through.
Highly likely? That's great to hear.

You know, I've been hearing some very intimidating things about boxing training. ESPN calls boxing the world's toughest sport, and I hear it'll get you shredded because the workouts are so intense.

I'm really hoping I can handle 5 straight days per week of hour long boxing sessions. I can't wait to start.

Oct 10th, baby.
 

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I'm not sure you can start off 5 days a week with a boxing routine, it is hard mentally and physically and if your just starting off, i don't think your body would be able to handle it (no offense, i can hardly do it 3 times a week) Id start off easy, like 3 times a week, see how your body takes it and build up from there. it would be a shame if you pushed yourself too hard the first week and hurt yourself, and wasn't able to do any sort of exercise, especially since you have so little time to get to your goal.

whats your routine anyway? you going to get a trainer right?

-melty
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Is it really that hard? I can train at my own pace, so I'm sure I'll be able to customize those 5days/week to be bearable. I would definately like to eventually maintain 5 days a week eventually. I'm used to a lot of physical activity as I've been working out really hard (a lot of times under fucked up conditions) for well over a year now. But of course, I don't want to speak too soon, so we'll see. I for sure don't want to get hurt early on- like you said i'll never get to my goal that way. I figure if I only invest time in 5 days of boxing per week and no weight lifting, i'll be able to do it just fine.

I'm going to join a boxing club and enroll in a program that says:

"The KO boxing training program is designed to create athletes in the sport of boxing. KO's Boxing training program is physically and mentally demanding...The KO program is professionally designed to appeal to all. Whether you are interested in losing weight, getting in great shape, stress relief, self-protection, gaining boxing knowledge, and even wish to become an amateur boxer, KO's boxing training program will fit your needs. You are encouraged to train at your own level."

I know it isn't a 1 on 1 program, but it speaks a high game. Right now I have no program, I'm just going to let the trainer mold me from the first day on.
 

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Judas said:
Highly likely? That's great to hear.

You know, I've been hearing some very intimidating things about boxing training. ESPN calls boxing the world's toughest sport, and I hear it'll get you shredded because the workouts are so intense.

I'm really hoping I can handle 5 straight days per week of hour long boxing sessions. I can't wait to start.

Oct 10th, baby.
Well Ill pu tit to you this way, at my gym its 4 days straight of 2 hour workouts. So I think 5 1 hour sessions you should be ok with. Just make sure you get enough rest and water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes, sir.

Now my last obstacle is finding ways to kill the time until October 10th. I want to start so bad, and I'm so sick of lifting/cardio.

Anyone have any good ideas for lifts/exercises I can do at my rec center that will get my prepped for boxing and will be sufficient to supplement cardio/weight training exercises?
 

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Get 15 minutes or so of jump rope in to warm up before you lift. Then finish your routine with a good calesthenic workout after your weight lifting.
(situps, jumping jacks, crunches, pushups, etc)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ah, I see. Yeah, I talked to the trainer and I was told that the "lifting" boxing takes care of is a lot of explosive, high-rep action prolonged for a while.

How does boxing work your legs, if at all?
 

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Judas said:
Hey, I'm new to this forum and very, very new to boxing. So new I haven't started yet, but I had a question for you guys.

It may seem like a no brainer, but here's some background first.

I've been working out in a gym (combined cardio and lifting) workouts for a year and eight months now. I went from well over 30% body fat to where I am now at 11%. My goal is to get to 8% as soon as possible, but right now I'm just maintaining until Ramadan (my religious fast) is over in about three weeks. However, upon returning to losing body fat, I'm not looking forward to going back to the gym; it has become very monotonous and uninteresting, and I'm ready to pick up a sport. I have been conditioning my body to become very athletic over the past almost two years (In my past, I have consistenly been working out between 2/days five days/week up to 4/days 7 days/week).

So, starting Oct 10 I want to start boxing, but I only want to do it if I can get to 8% or lower if I train under a REAL trainer and a REAL program (not some adult fitness class bullshit) 5 days/week paired with 5-6 small meals of clean foods in a calorie deficit. Also, I'll lift if I have to, but to my understanding boxing routines take care of that.

Anyway, what do you guys think? Can I use boxing (4-5 day/week, probably 5) and good diet as a catalyst to get to 8% (or lower) body fat?

After I get to my bodyfat goal, I want to focus on becoming the best boxer I can be.
Boxing should get you below 8% body fat if you do it long enough. One thing that really gets fat off of you, is the medicine ball. I started doing 2 sets of 25 with a 12lb medicine ball on a 45 degree incline, and it got rid all of the fat on my stomach (which there was very little to begin with). Along with doing sit ups on the incline, you should lose the fat in no time. If I were you,I'd stop weight lifting, because while looking like Frank Bruno or Mike Tyson would be really cool, it effects your stamina a lot. Too much muscle will weigh you down. Jumping rope, hitting the bags, and ring work will get you very fit, and you should notice a difference quick, but don't expect to have a 6 back in 60 days or what ever, that sort of stuff comes with time.
 

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Judas said:
Ah, I see. Yeah, I talked to the trainer and I was told that the "lifting" boxing takes care of is a lot of explosive, high-rep action prolonged for a while.

How does boxing work your legs, if at all?
Your legs get a great workout as you'll see. Not just the 15-20 minutes of jumprope as your warmup, but also all of the movements in boxing require leg strength. Youll really feel the burn when you get into the "ducking" routine. Your coach will put a rope up between the corners of the ring and have you practice moving forward while ducking under the rope from side to side. That builds up leg strength. So does all of the footwork required to move properly, that you'll be practicing while shadowboxing, hitting your bags, etc.

Your legs will definitely get stronger
 
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