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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to the forum but I have a few questions. I'm 18 years old, 140 pounds, 5'7", and honestly I've been fighting my whole life. I've always been picked on for being the little guy, and not having money. Anyways to cut the to point. I am very interested in boxing. I am somewhat out of shape due to smoking, but I am slowly quitting as I have been working out. I was just curious if any veterans to the sport could give me a few pointers to, idk, maybe point me in the right direction. The way my schedule is set up now. I work out three times a week. One day I work Shoulders, chest, back, and legs. The next I work arms, and I do cardio. I was just curious if you guys could give me a few pointers on eating healthy, working out to become an amateur boxer, and weightlifting while still keeping speed. I want to drop 5 pounds so I can fight lightweight, but I still want to gain more power/strength. Thanks for any tips, Josh
 

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Tip # 1: Quit smoking. Totally.

Tip #2: You are over-training (weight-lifting) if you work that many muscle groups in one day. You are definitely not getting an effective workout. My suggestion would be a four day split routine. 2 days on, 1 day off, 2 days on. Monday, Tuesday: ON. Wednesday: OFF Thursday, Friday: ON
On Monday and Thursday, work legs.
On Tuesday and Friday, work upper body. Split your upper body between Chest / Back & Shoulders/Tris/Bis Don't do too much bicep work, <<world's most useless muscle>>.
Throw in a generous portion of ab work for every day you workout (60 reps of your favourite excercises in 3 or 4 sets) Your body needs time to recover from each workout.

Tip #3: do a bunch of dynamic excercises (push ups / pull ups / chin ups / dips / etc etc as part of your weight-lfiting. This will help you to maintain dynamic strength movement. I do push-ups on the day that I work chest. Pull-ups on the day I work back....etc etc...
 

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I dont mean to take over this thread but Im 17 and about 5'6" and weigh about 135 Lbs...I dont think im going to grow any taller. This probably has been asked before but is height a major factor in boxing?
 

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koodlax said:
I dont mean to take over this thread but Im 17 and about 5'6" and weigh about 135 Lbs...I dont think im going to grow any taller. This probably has been asked before but is height a major factor in boxing?
Height will help you to decide how to fight an opponent. If someone is taller, or shorter than you, you will have to adjust.

A fighter who relies on physical size to determine their skill will certainly have a lot of weaknesses if they don't train and develop all aspects of their craft.

I found a half-step backwards often forced a taller opponent to throw a right cross after jabbing (they thought I was fully backing up to avoid the jab) and then I would slip under the jab, go to the body (right hand), and then uppercut or hook with the left hand.

This is boxing, not basketball. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the tips, however im faced with a problem. I am a college student, I go to class three days a week, and work 3 days a week, so I can really only fit my workout into two days so i don't know if their is anyway around it, but i just don't have the time. And as for quitting smoking it's a hard thing, but I plan on getting the patch in the near future, and quitting. I tried completely cold turkey, but to be honest, I have deep rooted anger problems, and after two days I flipped out and broke a few things. Anyways, if anyone has any other tips I'm open to any suggestions
 

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MISFITIZZLE said:
I am new to the forum but I have a few questions. I'm 18 years old, 140 pounds, 5'7", and honestly I've been fighting my whole life. I've always been picked on for being the little guy, and not having money. Anyways to cut the to point. I am very interested in boxing. I am somewhat out of shape due to smoking, but I am slowly quitting as I have been working out. I was just curious if any veterans to the sport could give me a few pointers to, idk, maybe point me in the right direction. The way my schedule is set up now. I work out three times a week. One day I work Shoulders, chest, back, and legs. The next I work arms, and I do cardio. I was just curious if you guys could give me a few pointers on eating healthy, working out to become an amateur boxer, and weightlifting while still keeping speed. I want to drop 5 pounds so I can fight lightweight, but I still want to gain more power/strength. Thanks for any tips, Josh
Hey, kid. I've been reading your posts.

You sound like a good kid to me that would make a good fighter.

Go find a boys club in the arena you live that has boxing and sign up for it, and start working out in the gym and learn how to fight, and no cigarettes, no booze and don't keep late nights and get healthy.

Boxing will can make you tough in body and in mind, its a fitness and confidence builder and when you grow older you'll be glad you did.

I wish you well.

JJC
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The quitting smoking thing is so hard to do. With the stress of being a college student and things like that. I also have an anxiety disorder so it kinda messes my head up, but I'll pull through it. I know I'm starting at somewhat of an old age to box, but I know I can be good, I have a very good state of mind towards it, and I think boxing is a positive thing in more ways than one.
 

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MISFITIZZLE said:
I also have an anxiety disorder so it kinda messes my head up, but I'll pull through it.
Start walking!

Walking is a slow rhythmic movement exercise.

When you go for walk, not only are you getting the benefits of the slow rhythmic movement, your lymph system is getting toxins out of your body, and when you go for walks the body is moving and flowing and energy is flowing through the meridians, and your grounding your feet to the earth, allowing for the earth's magnetic energy to flow though your body, energizing your cells.

Your also looking out as you walk and your externalizing taking things in through your eyes looking at far away distances, which increases the electronmagnetic energy in your body and this makes your body more alkakline and less susceptible to diease.

It also has a profound effect on your state of mind and happiness factor.

Also the lack of walking causes the body's elimination channels to become slow and sluggish.

Walking is perhaps the most healthist form of exercise that a person could ever do.

Start going for at least a one hour walk every day, depending on the pace you chose to walk that would be about a 2-3 mile walk.

In addition to a fighter getting out there in the mornings and doing their road work (running) ... there were a lot of great fighters that included long walks in their over all training. I know Rocky Marciano did, he believed it built his stamina. It will if the walks are long enough.

I remember another great fighter Sonny Liston ... in training for his title fight with Floyd Patterson back in the early 1960s ... he walked 8 miles a day wearing 9 pound shoes ... in addition to the rest of his physical training in preparing for that fight.

Get out there and start walking every day, it'll be good for you. But you got to do it every day for it to really do you any good.

Then you can later begin to build upon that as you get to feeling better and stronger and start doing road work in the mornings, and going to the gym and working out.
 

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MISFITIZZLE said:
The quitting smoking thing is so hard to do. With the stress of being a college student and things like that. I also have an anxiety disorder so it kinda messes my head up, but I'll pull through it. I know I'm starting at somewhat of an old age to box, but I know I can be good, I have a very good state of mind towards it, and I think boxing is a positive thing in more ways than one.
If you have not seen a doctor regarding your anxiety disorder, then do so. Especially if you take up a training regimen that is physically demanding. You may need to re-evaluate your medication --assuming you have been prescribed anything for it--if you start a training program, or quit smoking. Both of those changes will result in a major chemical change.

I can't second all the electronmagnetic and alkalinity statements that JCC has made, but walking is a formidable, low impact fat burning excercise. I also highly reccomend it for many reasons.

As for the alkalinity remark, the best way to combat this, is very simple: drink 500ml-1000ml (1/2 to 1 litre) of bottled water BEFORE you get out of bed in the morning. Literally, before you get out of bed. The minute you're vertical, it's too late. Your body chemistry and your metabolic reponse (the chemical dump each body goes through after REM sleep is stopped) change once you stand up and get out of bed. You can drink it sitting up on the edge of the bed, and the quicker the better.

It's hard at first, but keep building on a small program, until you can accomplish all the suggestions you've heard on here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah I've seen a doctor for my anxiety, and I'm prescribe Xanax for it. To be honest, I think my anxiety is all mental, and not physical at all. I truly believe the reason I have this problem is because I am out of shape because my anxiety attacks usually concern me only when my heart is beating fast, and i tend to turn into a hypochondriac rather fast. As for quitting smoking, I bought a pack of 100's, and I'm only smoking half a cigarette at a time. I don't want to get the patch because that's still nicotine going into your body, so eventually I am going to quit completely cold turkey. Thanks all for the positive comments. The first paycheck I get with my new job I'm going to buy a heavy bag, a speedbag and platform, a double end bag, a jumprope, and some handwraps. I already have a decent pair of everlast 14 ounce gloves so I have that much covered haha. To be honest I'm pretty pumped to get started.
 

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MISFITIZZLE said:
Yeah I've seen a doctor for my anxiety, and I'm prescribe Xanax for it. To be honest, I think my anxiety is all mental, and not physical at all. I truly believe the reason I have this problem is because I am out of shape because my anxiety attacks usually concern me only when my heart is beating fast, and i tend to turn into a hypochondriac rather fast. As for quitting smoking, I bought a pack of 100's, and I'm only smoking half a cigarette at a time. I don't want to get the patch because that's still nicotine going into your body, so eventually I am going to quit completely cold turkey. Thanks all for the positive comments. The first paycheck I get with my new job I'm going to buy a heavy bag, a speedbag and platform, a double end bag, a jumprope, and some handwraps. I already have a decent pair of everlast 14 ounce gloves so I have that much covered haha. To be honest I'm pretty pumped to get started.
Well, if your just wanting to get in shape you really don't have to start out with buying all that stuff. Just start a simple daily exercise rountine of doing calisthenics, stretching and resistence exercises (without the use of weights to help you get stronger) and you can build upon that and add other things later.

When you get yourself in shape, you'll come to be of a different and better frame of mind, and you'll begin to feel you can do any thing.

If you don't know how to exercise I can make some futher suggestions that can help you to get started with it. But don't just talk about it. Do it! You can't get in shape just by talking about what your going to do. You got to get started and just do it. Start taking those long walks every day I had mentioned in an earlier post. That's one of the most over all healthy exercises you could ever do.
 

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JCC said:
When you get yourself in shape, you'll come to be of a different and better frame of mind, and you'll begin to feel you can do any thing.
Agreed, JCC.

However, one small warning to the original poster: when you begin to feel you can do "anything"...that's a great time to go back and see your doctor to have your prescription re-evaluated. You may not need the same dosage/strength if you have been following a diet/fitness regimen and made other healthy choices, like having quit smoking.

It's not a great time to decide to stop taking your medication without consulting a doctor-- just because you are feeling better, and the amount of anxiety attacks have decreased.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
as for the anxiety, it's nearly gone. I'm slowly going to ween myself off of the medication, because to be honest, I think anxiety is psychosematic, and if ya have a strong enough will power you can overcome it. As for the quitting smoking, in the past week I've went from smoking a pack a day down to smoking at the most 5. I'm thinking about buying the smoke away pill, because it's the only natural quitting smoking thing on the market. I almost went the entire day yesterday without one, but I got a migrane so bad it hurt to walk around. As for my training, my friend is getting his manager's license, as he is pretty knowlegable in boxing, his dad boxed for about 20 years of his life, so that will be good... Free training :laugh:
 

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MISFITIZZLE said:
as for the anxiety, it's nearly gone. I'm slowly going to ween myself off of the medication, because to be honest, I think anxiety is psychosematic, and if ya have a strong enough will power you can overcome it.
Be very, very careful about this. Tell your doctor of your plans. You also mentioned alcohol in another thread...very bad combination (alcohol and depressants)....

You can try some non-medicinal therapies for the anxiety, and that can help you to determine if yours is long-term or based on a particular trauma (real or otherwise)....this should result in a deeper understanding of your psychosomatic belief, and the will power approach.

Besides, your doctor will tell you, anxiety disorder is basically when a medical examination can find no physical or organic cause, when an illness appears to result from emotional conditions such as anger, depression and guilt, then it might be classified psychosomatic.

In other words, your response to those conditions causes anxiety attacks, and not the other way around. Will power has very little to do with that, if you don't have the other tools to deal with it, under the assumption that you will no longer be on meds. I know people that have a "make-up" that permits them to deal with a ton of stress, with no detrimental effects to their health. Many an average person would probably have a nervous breakdown in their shoes. So be careful when dealing with meds/aniexty, is all I'm saying.

It's not a weakness to have to acknowledge and manage anxiety issues, but it will become a major detriment if you think you can ignore it and "will-power" it away.

Finding a good balance between diet, physical activity and emotional (relationships, work, school,etc)challenges is of utmost importance, and you may wish to consider it your number one priority.

Like JCC advised, start with some long walks, but be careful about assuming that better health than yesterday and feeling better than last week, is equal to "cured".
 

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MISFITIZZLE said:
As for my training, my friend is getting his manager's license, as he is pretty knowlegable in boxing, his dad boxed for about 20 years of his life, so that will be good... Free training
The only thing I'm going to comment on is this you said about training, and as for that other stuff you mentioned about the drugs your taking. I'm no doctor, I'll just leave that between you and your doctor.

As for the training you mentioned, and its free. Go for it, you got to start some where.

I'll just leave this thought with you. "Nothing will work unless you do something."
 

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Goodluck in all of this. I can relate to the smoking woes.
I smoked for about 7 years, and quitting was not easy. This much I can tell you- You will never quit as long as you enjoy it. If you enjoy the feel of inhaling a cigarette and look forward to doing it, youll keep on smoking. You have to really WANT to quit, and not enjoy smoking anymore for you to be able to quit. Good Luck!
 

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Hey, I hear cigarettes are going up here in Texas on January 1 st for reasons of a new tax law, and they are going up a dollar a package. I think that'll will be a good incentive for some smokers here in Texas to quit smoking. I think some or even many will for reasons of it.
 

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we have a complete smoking ban in scotland and i even mean bars and clubs, any public place you are caught you can be fined upto £500.
 

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Don't smoke anything. Have a strict daily nutrition routine for every day. This is what I d, and what my nephew(I train him) does:

Breakfast- High fibre cereal with 2 glasses of milk for calcium

Brunch- Low fat, energy bar

Lunch- Caeser salad and chicken and 2 glasses of orange juice or apple juice

Dinner- Most days we have red meat and vegetables plus a glass of orange juice

Supper- Have a smoothie

There we go. If you stick to that diet as wellas ome fat and some portions of beanson toast, you should be fit with the training and all that. Dont forget to drink a glass of water before bed to clear your liver. Good luck
 

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I knew a guy once, back in Ohio, who was a boxer. We boxed in the same club,turned 21 together, boxed vs each other, and also went out with one sister each in a family. I made it to be a pro, now I dont fight as much now I broke my hand in my last fight. He never made it past amateur. He was a better boxer than me, but never had the hunger nor the stamina to succeed. I am not blowing my trumpet, but only injuries have pulled back my career. His downfall was the temptations that came with boxing. The girls, the booze, the cigarettes and went one one further...drugs. Last I heard, he was hooked on heroin and living in a bedsit, alone. This may be farfeched, but the reason this happenned was he was not hungry enough to succeed. This could happen to you if you do not focus solely on boxing. People call it the poor man's sport, we have achance to make it big and make serious dollars. Don't fall into the temptations and live in a bedsit, make a name for yourself and you will make enough money to buy a house. Good luck
 
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