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I started to practice boxing 2 months ago and recently had a sparring with a boxer that has the same amount of time practicing I have.

I tried to put in practice all the techniques I was thought in training, but my sparring partner started to fight like crazy trowing punches ("hooks") with no technique, I was able to land some jabs and cross in his head but it was difficult to cover from the burden of "hooks" he was trowing. In the end I figured out that the best way to defend from his attack was to fight like him to prevent a knockout.

My questions is, is there an elegant way to defend and attack a sparring partner that fights like crazy? The only thing that comes to my mind is to step in attack and then clinch
 

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Cotto Vs. Margarito. Watch that fight. Do what Cotto does for the first 6 rounds lol or De La Hoya Vs. Trinidad do what De La Hoya did in rounds 9-12 :D
 

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Cotto Vs. Margarito. Watch that fight. Do what Cotto does for the first 6 rounds lol or De La Hoya Vs. Trinidad do what De La Hoya did in rounds 9-12 :D
Nah man, that added to Cotto getting tired. He used no lateral movement, tried to keep pace throwing in combination, and didn't clinch. When opponents are how he is saying, the best bet is going Hopkins style, a lot of lateral movement, some jabs, and a lot of counter punching with some feints thrown in(feints are mostly for experienced volume punches though).
 

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It sound like your sparring partner is undisciplined and just head hunting. you stated that you land some jabs that's good now double your jabs and learn to bob and weave. When he misses he will get tired quickly. It might help to learn how to throw rammers or jabs to the body. since you have only been training for a couple months only time and more sparring can teach you the proper timing and distance to counter this type of sparring. Keep your hands up and your chin down, i hope this helped. Keep on training:)
 

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Normally a person with no technique has their hands down, doesn't turn on their punches, doesn't extend fully, and has very little power. You shouldn't have much trouble. Learn to move your head and learn to bob and weave. Learn how to Parry and learn how to block with the back of your gloves.
 

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Normally a person with no technique has their hands down, doesn't turn on their punches, doesn't extend fully, and has very little power. You shouldn't have much trouble. Learn to move your head and learn to bob and weave. Learn how to Parry and learn how to block with the back of your gloves.
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you have no idea what you are talking about....
 

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Yes...and thats why i box and you don't? If a person boxes they should have no trouble fighting someone with no technique. When you get hit with a winging haymaker it's because A) You're slow B) You have horrible reflexes or C) You can't box. And thats what a person who has no technique does. He throws winging haymakers. His hands will drop because he's throwing winging punches instead of straight punches that get in and get out causing his face/chin to be WIDE open for A) An uppercut B) A hook C) A straight right depending on where the swing is coming from when you bob and weave the punches and depending on your stance whether you're a southpaw or an orthadox fighter. His footwork will be off balanced and he will be squared up. He will not turn his punches because his punches will be swung and when he actually throws a straight punch it wont be fully extended. When you throw winging punches your wide open in the face and stomach and you're squared up. And you can't turn on a punch when you're squared up..cmon, i learned this in my first 8 sessions of boxing. Please..you're talking to someone who's boxed for a year and a half and has the boxing knowledge of someone whos been boxing for 7. :thumbsup: turn it into a debate and bring up your knowledge. What do you have to counter it? Nothing, i'm sure of it.

Boxing is all about technique, how and where you hit. Fighters you never thought had technique have technique. A fighter with no technique does what i said above does. Mainly the swinging of punches.
 

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What I would do is try to hold him off with strong, stinging jabs and crosses and try to duck and dodge his wild hooks or catch them with your defence, and everytime you dodge or block one of his hooks he'll be off balance and you can catch him with stronger counter punches. You also have to use your footwork to 'run' around the ring and make it impossible for him to plant his feet or get you against the ropes.
 

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I started to practice boxing 2 months ago and recently had a sparring with a boxer that has the same amount of time practicing I have.

I tried to put in practice all the techniques I was thought in training, but my sparring partner started to fight like crazy trowing punches ("hooks") with no technique, I was able to land some jabs and cross in his head but it was difficult to cover from the burden of "hooks" he was trowing. In the end I figured out that the best way to defend from his attack was to fight like him to prevent a knockout.

My questions is, is there an elegant way to defend and attack a sparring partner that fights like crazy? The only thing that comes to my mind is to step in attack and then clinch
Sounds like he may have been fighting a Enzo Calzaghe trained fighter.
 

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you have no idea what you are talking about....

And your advice would be? :rolleyes:


It sounds like he's reckless? If so take advantage of his overeagerness by stepping back or to the side and countering, work your jab and when he leaves himself open make him pay for it by hitting him clean. Get him clean a couple of times and he'll be more cautious about coming forward to fight you, putting you in control.
 
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