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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just curious if it is considered an aerobic workout. I read somewhere (not sure where) that if you work in rounds with 1 minute breaks, it's not considered aerobic. Is this true? Thanks
 

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Logan60 said:

I was just curious if it is considered an aerobic workout.
First we need to know what an aerobic exercise is?

Acrobic means "without air."

Any form of exercise where you are breathing heavily but can still have a conversation is acrobic exercise.

Aerobic exercises stimulates blood flow throughout the body, oxygenates the body and speeds the elimination of toxins from your body.

As for those who aren't boxers that just simply shadow box today as a form of exercise, it could be called an aerobic exercise depending on how much energy they chose to exert in shadow boxing as a form of exercise.

However, that's not the reason that a boxer will shadow box.

Shadow boxing can also be an anaerobic exercise as well depending on how much energy a person may chose to exert into shadow boxing as merely just simply as being a form of exercise.

Anaerobic means "without air."

Any form of exercise where you are breathing so hard you can barely talk is anaerobic.

The benefits are, generally, a tremendous stimulation of your entire system, in effect, you are putting the survival of every cell in your body at risk because the lack of oxygen.

This is very helpful in "reprogranming the body" and allowing the body to increase its elimination of toxins and stop any cellular activity that was abnormal.

As for boxers, they normally, or usually will exert much energy into shadowing boxing, and in that case it would really be more in being an anaerobic exercise and not an aerobic exercise.

If you were shadow boxing only just as being a mere exercise as for whether was is an aerobic or anaerobic exercise would depend on how much energy you chose to exert in shadow boxing,

But to boxers shadow boxing is much for than just simply a form of exercise.

Its to practice fighting, boxing, developing and shapening your form and practice of throwing punches, and combination punches, and for developing hand speed.

Its good to use very light hand weights. I often did when I was boxing.

I still shadow box to this day, as in my daily workouts just to stay in shape.

Logan said:

I read somewhere (not sure where) that if you work in rounds with 1 minute breaks, it's not considered aerobic.

Is this true?
It can be just depends on how much energy you chose to exert in shadow boxing.

When I was boxing, and even to this day in my daily workouts I never did, or do exercise by rounds, except for in sparring in the ring with a sparring partner.

JJC
 

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JCC basically told u everything you need to kno...cant think of anything he left out.

my personal way to shadowbox is do one round regular fight-type shadowboxing (real movements, fast and powerful punches with lots of headmovements. basically how i would normally fight)

then i do one round with technique based shadowboxing, working on correct technique and throwing of punches and movements (pivoting is a big one).

I alternate round for round like this to work on everything evenly. I usually work on technique in the mirrow, and do fight-shadowboxing in the ring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Another question JCC, if you don't go by rounds, then how do you go about shadow boxing? Do you have a time limit? I like the idea of not restricting myself to rounds, but not sure how to go about it. Thanks
 

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Logan60 said:

Another question JCC, if you don't go by rounds, then how do you go about shadow boxing?

Do you have a time limit?

I like the idea of not restricting myself to rounds, but not sure how to go about it.
Though I'm not boxing any more, as an ex-fighter, I still bascially train and workout daily much like I did, and in the same ways as I did when I was still boxing just to stay in shape.

First, the advice I would give to a fighter. That is, boxer, or to a person who has taken up boxing as a form of self defense, or for just simply to be physically fit. I'd advise to NEVER perform an exercise to complete physical exhaustion. Of course, that would include shadow boxing, for that is a form of physical exercise too. Especially, not if you are working out daily, for reasons that it will break your body down. You want to build your health, your strength, your stamina, and your body, not to break it down.

Never perform any exercise to complete exhaustion. Perform an exercise only until you begin to tire.

As a natural response the number of times you can perform any particular exercise will increase, or the longer you can perform an exercise will increase, as your body grows stronger and more well-conditioned.

As for your question about shadow boxing!

Some today like to train and exercise according to rounds, two or three minutes rounds in skipping rope, punching the bags, and shadow boxing things such as that, and to take a minute rest or less in between rounds and others do not exercise that way.

Floyd Mayweather Jr, for example, doesn't go rounds in training, except in the ring when sparring with sparring partners. Nor, did I. Nor, do I, either. I will do an exercise until I begin to tire, then I relax, take a short rest to caught my breath then repeat the exercise again. I may take a minute, or less to catch my breath then to perform the same excercise again for however many times, or for as long I may chose to do so until I began to tire.

Some exercises for various reasons I may choose to do more times, or for longer than others.

As for shadow boxing, for example, when I was boxing. I would shadow box until I began to tire. And I still do it that way to this day, in my daily workouts.

Then relax and to take a short rest, to caught my breath maybe to take a minute as less, then to repeat it again, and again, and again.

Sometimes I may would chose to shadow box for 20-30 minutes at times in doing it that way. I still do this in my daily workouts to this day, as a form of exercise just to keep in shape. Just shadow box until you begin to tire, then to take a rest. The repeat the exercise again, for as many times as you may chose to do so in your daily workouts if you are working out daily.

I don't lift weights! Nor, am I am advocate of lifting weights for boxers. As for basic physically training, in addition to roadwork (running) in the mornings, and working out in the gym, skipping rope, sparring, punching the bags, etc, etc. In addition to all that I recommend doing hard (intense) calisthenics, stretching, and resistence exercises. And to that to add shadow boxing!

A fighter should do lot's and lot's of shadow boxing daily.

I've always liked to use very light hand weights, maybe one or two pound hand weights when I shadow box.

You want to exert much energy when you shadow box. You want to put some snap into your punches shadow boxing. You want to put your whole body into it!

For example, throwing punches, jabs, hooks, and various forms of combination punches.

For the boxers, this is practicing fighting, and you want to put your whole body and to exert much energy into it.

Also in shadow boxing you want to dance a little to develop your foot work, and I always liked to practice feinting punches, and also feinting with my head and shoulders, and to bob and weave when I shadow box and as if I were rolling with punches or under punches, and using my legs and feet in such a way as if I were sliding away from punches.

As for shadow boxing, as a form of exercise you want to put your whole body into it, and to exert a lot of energy when you shadow box.

If you do it that way, its going to give you a really good workout.

Depending on how good of shape your in, you may be out of breath after a shadow boxing for a minute or two.

If so take a short rest, for a minute or less, or for however long it takes you to recover and to catch your breath and then to repeat it again. Then just keep doing that until you've finished the workout of shadow boxing for however long you may chose to do it.

I think I may have given you more information than you've asked for. But I hope that in some way you can find it helpful.

JJC
 

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Logan60 said:

Thanks alot JCC, that was extremely helpful.
Then I'm glad that I took the time to share with you what I did that was based on my own personal experience in training.

Once someone has learned how to train, I always think a person needs to develop their own personal workouts for themselves, and most do that after they have learned how to train.

I wish you well.

JJC
 

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JCC said:
Then I'm glad that I took the time to share with you what I did that was based on my own personal experience in training.

Once someone has learned how to train, I always think a person needs to develop their own personal workouts for themselves, and most do that after they have learned how to train.

I wish you well.

JJC
Thats what I did, I switched things around so I would benefit from it more, and I don't have to wait or anything.
 

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bill1234 said:
Thats what I did, I switched things around so I would benefit from it more, and I don't have to wait or anything.
Even in fighting (boxing), you can develop some of your own moves in the ring, through trial and error, you don't just have to wait and to only just to rely on a trainer to teach you somethings.

For example, back when I was boxing I came later as I gained more experience to want to use the left hook more in my fights.

I'd practice nothing else in the gym, and when sparring for a while but only to use my left hand, and not my right at all for a while throwing left jabs and left hooks.

Finally, I developed this more throw trial and error ... to faint a left jab, to get the hook in, and to hook to the body, when I had my opponent against the ropes.

When you throw the left hook you are open for your opponent to throw a right to your head.

So what I'd do is faint the left jab, and as I did, with my opponent against the ropes.

I would then bring my right foot forward as I feinted the jab, to bring my right foot forward be above to use leverage to be to put all my weight and whole body into throwing the hook to the body, and as I threw the hook, to bring my right hand to my face to block his right, and bring the hook into my opponents body just as hard as I could throw it, and I'd dropped a lot of guys with that punch and they won't be able to catch their breath in time before being counted out.

When I had my opponent against the ropes, when I throw the left hook to the body, as I did I'd bring my right hand to my face for reasons that when you throw the left hook your open for your opponent to hit you with his right. So I'd bring my right hand to my face as I throw the left hook to the body to block his right as I threw the hook to the body.

Sometimes I would hook to the body, again and again, a double left hook to body.

I'd practice it over and over again every day in the gym, and also to hook to the head.

Any way, that's how I first began to develop the left hook and to be able to hit hard hooking to the body and to the head.

JJC
 

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hey JCC have you never thought about training young fighters? with your knowledge i think you'd be a very good trainer.
 

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tommygunn said:
hey JCC have you never thought about training young fighters? with your knowledge i think you'd be a very good trainer.
Appreciate the compliment.

I earn my living as as general contractor and business owner in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex area in north Texas.

And that tends to require much of my time and attention.

But I've had some thoughts about building a boxing gym some where here, and start my own amatuer boxing team.

In time I may eventually get around to doing it for reasons it would give me pleasure to do it. Mostly as being a fun thing, a kind of toy for me I guess you could say.

I don't think I know every thing. But in having spent fourteen years boxing at least I know some things.

There are many out there day that have never boxed training fighters today.

Then of course, there are many who were unsucessful boxing that are out there training fighters today too.

As things are today, any body can be a fight trainer, but it use to not be like that.

You couldn't train fighters if you'd never been a boxer.

You had to know how to fight! And guys who really know how to fight, naturally know how to train too.

I hope I'm not going across here as if I think I know every thing.

All I know is what I was taught and learned in the time I spent boxing.

As for the move in the ring, I mentioned in my last post about hooking to the body.

I've since edited my last post to make to it to be an easier read.

Its easier to demontrate moves in the ring than just to try to explain it without demonstration.

Any way, to what I said about hooking to the body, if you read my last post again, to it I'll add this:

When you have your opponent against the ropes like that and after you have feinted a left jab to get the left hook in, and as you bring your right foot forward to get leverage in throwing the left hook to your opponents body to be able to apply all the weight of you body behind the punch.

As I mentioned earlier when you throw the left hook your open for your opponent to hit you with his right, you bring your right hand to your face as you throw the left hook to block his right, and if I can I'd also try to caught his punch if he throws it with my right hand, and to hold his right hand with my right arm as I have him against the ropes to be able then to even get more leverage behind the hook to his body, perferably to hook him again, again (a double left hook to the body), it would be a short punch not more than about a six-inch punch, just above his belly to his solar plexes, BOOM, BOOM. I'd doubled hook him, BOOM, BOOM just-as-hard as I could hit him with the full weight of my body behind the punch, and to bring it in sharp, hard and quick, BOOM, BOOM.

I practiced this a lot on the big bag, the heavy bag in the gym, and in sparring in the ring a lot to perfect it and to get my timing, balance and leverage just right.

Your able to get the leverage you need in having brought your right foot forward when you hook to the body in that way.

And there is no punch that is a painful as this short punch to the solar plexes.

If you hit your opponent just right with this punch, even with one punch to the body like this you can really hurt your him bad with that punch and especially so if you can hit hard in throwing a left hook, you'll really hurt him with it.

I liked to get the hook twice to the body in, and to exert a lot of energy behind the punch, and to make it snap: BOOM, BOOM. And the fight may very well be over, you may drop him with it.

After I had gotten really good by practicing this move in the ring in fights, and had developed the left hook all the more in being able to throw a good left hook and to be able to punch harder in throwing the hook I started winning some of my fights with this particular move in the ring in some fights.

I got some knockouts with it. They'd go down and to not to be able to caught their breath and the referee would count them out.

It came to be one of my most favorite moves in the ring in fights.

There's much to know, much to learn.

JJC
 

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much to know, much to learn indeed. im only a lightweight of about 132 pounds, and have been boxing for just over two years. my body punches are getting better as i learn to put more of my weight into it. i work on a super bag in my gym as well... the 300 pound one i believe.

my trainer has me do drills for about 2-3 rounds of nonstop headmovement and body punches and head punches, mostly uppercuts and hooks. i also practice 'turning the corner' so to speak. i find that after working on this bag, my body punches, and overall work on the inside has increased greatly.

the last time i sparred someone outside of my team, was someone about my age, height and weight. i destroyed him with my jab and feints, and then catching him on the ropes with my body shots.

afterwards my trainer was impressed and explained to me " if you have a headache, its no big deal and you'll get to work anyway, but when you have a stomach ache, you have to stay home and rest" impying that body shots are indeed the real killers in the ring.
 

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g00dz said:

I find that after working on this bag, my body punches, and overall work on the inside has increased greatly.
Working out on the heavy bag will increase your punching power if you spend enough time doing it every day, it will.

Getting in a good work out every day on the heavy bag strengthens your stomach, arms, shoulders and back.

You want to have strong arms, but you want to also have strong legs, and to know and remember what generates punching power. Its leverage, timing and speed.

Remember all that when your working out on the heavy bag, and it will help you to increase your punching power all the more.

JJC
 

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g00dz said:

Afterwards my trainer was impressed and explained to me " if you have a headache, its no big deal and you'll get to work anyway, but when you have a stomach ache, you have to stay home and rest" impying that body shots are indeed the real killers in the ring.
Especially they will be if you can hit hard, your a hard puncher.

On the other hand, if you don't have the big punch, you can still get the job done working punches to your opponents body by a lot of punches hitting him many times punching to the body.

I want to put this in your mind for it may help you: "It's not how hard you hit your opponent necessarily that tires or hurts him but how many times you hit him."

What I'm saying is that its great to have the big punch and to be able to hit hard, but you can also take you opponent out with combination punches.

Its not so important as for how hard you hit him, but how many times you hit him.

To that I'll add that throwing punches in the ring can make you tired, but taking punches can make you tired too. Taking punches can make you more tired than throwing punches.

This may be too far ahead for you now, but I'll share it with you any way.

The first thing that usually will go out on a fighter in the ring is his legs when he gets tired and exhausted.

Working to your opponents body, for him to keep taking punches to the body will eventually tire him, punching to the body will take his legs out.

Usually, the legs will go out first, and thereafter his hands will go down leaving him open for shots to the head.

First the legs goes out on the fighter, then his arms he starts get arm weary.

It does always happen in the order, but more often than not it does.

If your opponent is not a flat footed fighter, and you come to see in rounds that he's no longer on up on his toes as he had before and he's flat footed.

You can take that as a sign that he's tiring, starting to get real tired.

You can wear your opponent down punching to his body, and punching to his body will or eventually will get his hands down making him open for shots to the head.

Work to the body, and when his hands go down leaving himself open for shots to the head move from working the body to the head.

When a fighter becomes exhausted in the ring, his hands will go down.

Usually, it will be his legs that will go out on him first.

Working to the body will take his legs out, and get his hands down.

This will happen when he gets tired and exhausted.

Finally, I'd like to further note that's it good if you have a big punch, but you don't necessarily have to have a big punch to get the knockout.

JJC
 
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