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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there...I hope this is the right place to post this :)
Where do I start...I love boxing and have always wanted to practise it, but I can't join a gym, or take a boxing course. I'm on my own.
I'm 17 and I've started 'training' at the age of 15 by running, swimming, doing very basic stuff such as push ups, abs, lifting etc... and punching a cardboard with rags around my fists :laugh:
Now that I have access to the Internet, I was wondering if there was a way to read or watch stuff about boxing that would teach me the moves? Does any of you know about homemade equipment that would help me improve? Any tips regarding a good routine?
In other words, I have no equipment at my disposal and has to find alternatives for everything (for exemple, I use a bag full of heavy books for lifting, etc...). I know that I will never be as well prepared as if I were practising in good conditions, but I want to do my best until I can take lessons.
Thanks for reading, sorry if it was a bit long :)
 

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Team Mayweather
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Yes, You very well can. It'll be tough but yes you most definnetly can. Food for thought. Heavyweight Title contender Calvin Brock learned boxing from boxing books with help from his father who had no boxing knowledge what so ever.
 

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Dont lift weights anymore, just do push ups and pull ups to build strength. And buy a pair of some cheap boxing gloves and a jump rope. That should only cost about 20 dollars.
 

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Calvarez
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Hi there...I hope this is the right place to post this :)
Where do I start...I love boxing and have always wanted to practise it, but I can't join a gym, or take a boxing course. I'm on my own.
I'm 17 and I've started 'training' at the age of 15 by running, swimming, doing very basic stuff such as push ups, abs, lifting etc... and punching a cardboard with rags around my fists :laugh:
Now that I have access to the Internet, I was wondering if there was a way to read or watch stuff about boxing that would teach me the moves? Does any of you know about homemade equipment that would help me improve? Any tips regarding a good routine?
In other words, I have no equipment at my disposal and has to find alternatives for everything (for exemple, I use a bag full of heavy books for lifting, etc...). I know that I will never be as well prepared as if I were practising in good conditions, but I want to do my best until I can take lessons.
Thanks for reading, sorry if it was a bit long :)
Sad to hear that you're on your own :(. I would suggest trying to buy cheap gloves and a jump rope like SJM said. Also you could maybe try and find some books or guides that teach the sport. You need to make sure you keep up your training routine as well - all the swimming, running, push ups etc. should stay.

I have a question for you as well. Is it possible that you'll be able to join a gym in a couple of years, or that you'll be better placed to learn the sport? If so, I would concentrate on learning the moves, maybe doing shadow boxing, and increase your knowledge of what to do. That'll help you for when you do properly step into the gym. Also, whilst you're learning about the sport you're probably reading rather than watching or doing it. So you need to make sure you keep up the hard work with the swimming and running and stuff. I hope I've helped you in some way. Feel free to ask more questions.
 

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rossboxing.com was/is a good source for me. particulary hit up ross boxing on youtube.com badace routines and tips on there...
 

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Look, don't get caught up on training. Boxing is all technique or skill, so for you the best way to learn is shadow boxing. Check out fighters like Ray Robinson, Duran, Hagler, etc. on youtube then try to mimic them. Shadow boxing is a lost art. I coach/train boxers and most them can't shadow box for *****.
 

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Actually, some lifting is okay, regular lifting shouldn't be done too often. You can still do some lifting often like deadlifts to increase back spring and quads and it's good for your balance, bench press should be done to strengthen your shoulders, serratus anterior, and triceps, squats to increase muscle in your quads further, and back excercise machines, serratus anterior machines, leg press should all be present in your training at some time. Running should be done a minimum 3 times for 20 minutes. 100 meter dashes should be done in sets of 6 forwards and backwards for spring, try to keep the time under 3 minutes, the average person should be able to do 100 meters in under 20 seconds or so if he or she is sprinting. Do a lot of pushups, situps, and non weighted squats, and if you wanna be kinda like a real boxer, maybe make a weight goal within the 11 major classes of boxing. Try to do excersises a minimum of 3 days a week for a minimum of 2 hours at a time, most people, once they are serious might do 3-4 hours a day 5 or more days a week. After some time you'll have to give your muscles some time to heal of course. Eat plenty of protein, a minimum of 2/3 of your body weight in lb to grams. Always after a workout is the prefered time, you can of course get it in bulk protein, but I prefer the more natural way, through nuts, eggs, lean meat, and a bit of whey. Of course I don't stress protein consumption as the most important part of training. Also if you can, you can make a makeshift dip bar with two objects close by that can support you without falling over, and maybe install a pullup bar, and if you're just hitting cardboard with rags, wait till you hit a heavybag, it's really different. Also buy some handwraps and some gloves, learn to put them on right and don't just wrap them for days around your knuckles, a lot of people make the mistake and might end up really putting a lot of force on their wrists and they'll get a shocking feeling around the area.
 

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Actually, some lifting is okay, regular lifting shouldn't be done too often. You can still do some lifting often like deadlifts to increase back spring and quads and it's good for your balance, bench press should be done to strengthen your shoulders, serratus anterior, and triceps, squats to increase muscle in your quads further, and back excercise machines, serratus anterior machines, leg press should all be present in your training at some time. Running should be done a minimum 3 times for 20 minutes. 100 meter dashes should be done in sets of 6 forwards and backwards for spring, try to keep the time under 3 minutes, the average person should be able to do 100 meters in under 20 seconds or so if he or she is sprinting. Do a lot of pushups, situps, and non weighted squats, and if you wanna be kinda like a real boxer, maybe make a weight goal within the 11 major classes of boxing. Try to do excersises a minimum of 3 days a week for a minimum of 2 hours at a time, most people, once they are serious might do 3-4 hours a day 5 or more days a week. After some time you'll have to give your muscles some time to heal of course. Eat plenty of protein, a minimum of 2/3 of your body weight in lb to grams. Always after a workout is the prefered time, you can of course get it in bulk protein, but I prefer the more natural way, through nuts, eggs, lean meat, and a bit of whey. Of course I don't stress protein consumption as the most important part of training. Also if you can, you can make a makeshift dip bar with two objects close by that can support you without falling over, and maybe install a pullup bar, and if you're just hitting cardboard with rags, wait till you hit a heavybag, it's really different. Also buy some handwraps and some gloves, learn to put them on right and don't just wrap them for days around your knuckles, a lot of people make the mistake and might end up really putting a lot of force on their wrists and they'll get a shocking feeling around the area.
as far as i know, the greatest fighters never touched weights and did just fine without them. You get enough power from body weight exercises, speed is more important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Many thanks to everybody who answered, I'm sure I can use your tips...ok, so I'll forget about lifting on a daily basis, and concentrate on running, push ups, shadow boxing...The jumping romp sounds like a good idea too :)

I have a question for you as well. Is it possible that you'll be able to join a gym in a couple of years, or that you'll be better placed to learn the sport?
Perhaps I'll join a gym in 5-6 years if everything goes well for me (meaning, if I get a job and can afford boxing lessons). I got a lot of time to get ready!

I got a few questions:
-Sometimes after jogging for a wihle I got this pain in my lunges, and it's different from a healthy panting...I mean it feels like the bottom of my lunges is burning. Should I keep going when it happens or stop?
-And when I do exercises such as abs, pulls up etc, is it better to do them all in a row, or to stop and stretch between each series?
-Is it better to work out before or after eating?

I think that's all, thanks again for taking the time to answer me :)
 

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Many thanks to everybody who answered, I'm sure I can use your tips...ok, so I'll forget about lifting on a daily basis, and concentrate on running, push ups, shadow boxing...The jumping romp sounds like a good idea too :)


Perhaps I'll join a gym in 5-6 years if everything goes well for me (meaning, if I get a job and can afford boxing lessons). I got a lot of time to get ready!

I got a few questions:
-Sometimes after jogging for a wihle I got this pain in my lunges, and it's different from a healthy panting...I mean it feels like the bottom of my lunges is burning. Should I keep going when it happens or stop?
-And when I do exercises such as abs, pulls up etc, is it better to do them all in a row, or to stop and stretch between each series?
-Is it better to work out before or after eating?

I think that's all, thanks again for taking the time to answer me :)

5 or 6 years? Thats a lot of wasted time when you can be doing some real training in a boxing gym. Go out and get a job now so you can sign up to a gym in a month or two. I dont know if you want to become a professional boxer or not but the sooner you sign up to a gym the better, because the older you get the more catching up ur gonna have to do with the younger guys. About the lung pain, ur probably just breatheing wrong. While ur running, breathe in and out of ur nose and not ur mouth. If the problem still continues after that, see a doctor.
 

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We all have our preferences, and I do both. There's no difference in each excersise, a bodyweight excersise to build your shoulders is no different from a machine excersise to build your shoulders. However in many cases, when training a muscle at the beggining, for the heavier people, it might be too much or for some people people not enough. Of course you can be a sucessful boxer doing just one of them or both. Also muscles are fine, they don't really slow you down, IF that is, you have the other muscles to back up any downsides to it, also weight training in fact, does not make your muscles slow and unflexible and heavy. There however are body builders who get a limited range of motion due to extreme muscular hypertrophy, but since we are boxers and not bodybuilders, we don't do excersises or eat like them so we won't have to worry really. And contrary to the pros who never touched weights, there are of course plenty of people in the NBA who train and in sports medicine, they are mostly taught to do weight training as part of their training regime, their flexibility, skill and strength aren't compromised from that, also, there are boxers who do all around weight training combined with bodyweight excersises who are some of the best like; Shane Mosley, Oscar De La Hoya, Evander Holyfield, and Konstantin Tszyu. And of course, like what everything you train for, you can do it all to increase your muscular endurance by using weights that you can carry with just a bit more than 60% of your power with high reps(20) in sets of 3. Also do excersises fast instead of getting a full motion like what you should do with all excersises if you're training for boxing.
 

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Calvarez
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Many thanks to everybody who answered, I'm sure I can use your tips...ok, so I'll forget about lifting on a daily basis, and concentrate on running, push ups, shadow boxing...The jumping romp sounds like a good idea too :)


Perhaps I'll join a gym in 5-6 years if everything goes well for me (meaning, if I get a job and can afford boxing lessons). I got a lot of time to get ready!

I got a few questions:
-Sometimes after jogging for a wihle I got this pain in my lunges, and it's different from a healthy panting...I mean it feels like the bottom of my lunges is burning. Should I keep going when it happens or stop?
-And when I do exercises such as abs, pulls up etc, is it better to do them all in a row, or to stop and stretch between each series?
-Is it better to work out before or after eating?


I think that's all, thanks again for taking the time to answer me :)
1. I would keep going until you really need to stop.

2. I generally do mine together. Then maybe have a break after about 30/45 minutes.

3. Probably before eating - you'll feel uncomfortable working out after eating. You could try going running before your breakfast, like really early in the morning. That'll be a good time to do it. And when you join your gym continue to run early in the morning.
 

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We all have our preferences, and I do both. There's no difference in each excersise, a bodyweight excersise to build your shoulders is no different from a machine excersise to build your shoulders. However in many cases, when training a muscle at the beggining, for the heavier people, it might be too much or for some people people not enough. Of course you can be a sucessful boxer doing just one of them or both. Also muscles are fine, they don't really slow you down, IF that is, you have the other muscles to back up any downsides to it, also weight training in fact, does not make your muscles slow and unflexible and heavy. There however are body builders who get a limited range of motion due to extreme muscular hypertrophy, but since we are boxers and not bodybuilders, we don't do excersises or eat like them so we won't have to worry really. And contrary to the pros who never touched weights, there are of course plenty of people in the NBA who train and in sports medicine, they are mostly taught to do weight training as part of their training regime, their flexibility, skill and strength aren't compromised from that, also, there are boxers who do all around weight training combined with bodyweight excersises who are some of the best like; Shane Mosley, Oscar De La Hoya, Evander Holyfield, and Konstantin Tszyu. And of course, like what everything you train for, you can do it all to increase your muscular endurance by using weights that you can carry with just a bit more than 60% of your power with high reps(20) in sets of 3. Also do excersises fast instead of getting a full motion like what you should do with all excersises if you're training for boxing.
I agree 100%. I do weight training all around and i'm 125. I'm as flexible as can be. I'm the slick type of boxer and it hasn't changed my flexibility one bit. Infact it made my jab much better than its ever been. It gave me more spring from the back workouts.
 
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