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I have always had pretty bad shin splints which obviously makes it hard to train. Anyone experience this pain and if so what can I do? I have tried the new shoes, icing them, and resting for weeks at a time but nothing seems to work. I hear you can wrap them but not sure how much good that will do.

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I have always had pretty bad shin splints which obviously makes it hard to train. Anyone experience this pain and if so what can I do? I have tried the new shoes, icing them, and resting for weeks at a time but nothing seems to work. I hear you can wrap them but not sure how much good that will do.

Thanks
Run on a softer surface.
 

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I think you should go try wrapping it. If that doesn't work go to the doctor and see what He/She can do for you cause you seem like you're doing basically everything you should be doing.
 

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Okay well the way to tell if you are or not. Stand up and look an the inside of your foot. If the inside of your foot (the arch) falls to the ground, you have flat feet.

Meaning you should be wearing shoes with good arch support since you don't have an arch.

Flat Footed people tend to get shin splints a lot more often than people who aren't flat footed.
 

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2 main causes for shin splints

too much too soon, and the wrong shoes are the top reasons people get shin splints. Never increase running distance more than 10% a week.

If your pain is high, near the knee, on the outside of your shinbone, then chances are it is from overuse. If your pain is inside above the ankle it can be either one or a combo of both causes. Hard surfaces and hills will aggravate the problem. Get fitted for a set of running shoes at a running store, it is worth the $. It actually dosen't cost much more than Sports Authority where the staff aren't as knowledgable.

You can get neoprene wraps which help with the pain but will not prevent shin pain. Ice and massage your shins before and after running and cut back on your milage until you feel better. Also jumping rope makes this worse so be careful while you are healing. To massage get some linement or oil and work your thumb along the shinbone appying even firm pressure, then move your thumbs to the back of the leg like you're spreading butter with a knife. Don't press too hard but it should hurt a little if they are really tender.
Hope this helps. I have had these for years, and one of the guys I train is having a problem with them right now.
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I have the same problems with jump rope aswell! I got an appointment with the physio she says my muscles in my lower legs are not balanced in strength correctly so we are gonna try and sort it out.
 

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used to

I used to get them at the beggining of the occassional track season. There's an exercise you can do. We used to do it with a towel and a partner. I think it could also be done solo with elastic. Sit down on your butt, legs straight out, pull your foot up, pivoting at the ankle, against resistance. It actually works the muscles in the front of your calf (shin). We used to do it and it seemed to really help.
 

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I've had the same problem for about a year and a half now, where icing/wrapping/resting only temporarily relives pain. I'm going to the doctor soon to get it checked out finally, because I read they do bone scans and other sorts of things to determine the exact problem because "shin splints" is sort of a general term. I'd suggest going to a doctor as well.
 

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I have been plagued with Shin Splints off and on during my 16 years of boxing. I found the biggest cause of shin splints for me was jumping rope and running on a hard surface. Treadmills alleviate the running issues, but if you can't jump rope on a pad or carpet, jump with both feet hitting the ground at the same time. It reduced the shock on a single shin If you already have pain I found that pivoting excercises like that guy posted earlier worked wonders. Some gyms actually have a pivot machine that you add weight to.
 
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