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Who had the weakest chin out of all of the heavyweights of all time?

  • Floyd Patterson

    Votes: 2 40.0%
  • Gerry Cooney

    Votes: 1 20.0%
  • Primo Carnera

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Michael Moorer

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 3 60.0%
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bill1234 said:
Who do you think had the weakest chin out of all of the heavyweights? I would have to say Patterson or Cooney.
Going to have to give this one more thought.

Just in passing, its been my experience that guys with thin necks couldn't take a punch. But its a fair trade I guess. For guys with thick necks tend to cut more easily.

JC
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hhascup said:
Are you talking about all Heavyweights, or just World Champions.

Heavyweight Frankie Hines was stopped something like 78 times.
I am talking about heavyweight champs and contenders.
 

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The Maul Brawling Slugger
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Floyd Patterson was demolished in the 1st Round not only once... but twice... by Sonny Liston. I chose Floyd Patterson simply based on that... closely followed by Gerry Cooney, Lennox Lewis, Frank Bruno, Earnie Shavers... and all of those other guys in that list in no particular order... Michael Moorer'd be last!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
White Tyson said:
Floyd Patterson was demolished in the 1st Round not only once... but twice... by Sonny Liston. I chose Floyd Patterson simply based on that... closely followed by Gerry Cooney, Lennox Lewis, Frank Bruno, Earnie Shavers... and all of those other guys in that list in no particular order... Michael Moorer'd be last!!!
Michael Moorers chin sucked.
 

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If we're limiting ourselves to guys who've held at least a portion of the HW title(and even if we're not LOL)then I've got to think former WBA "King" Bruce Seldon would be hard to beat for a weak chin. I recall when he fought Tyson,Ri**** Bowe was bragging about his 1:49 KO of Seldon and that Tyson wouldn't dispose of Seldon as quickly as Bowe did.....and then Tyson beat his mark by several seconds. :)
 

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RoccoMarciano said:
Yeah, liked we've already written about, Foreman lightly tapped Moorer and he hit the canvas
I think I know what your saying, but it could have (I say could have been) that Moorer JUST QUIT! That happens a lot in fights! A guy's tired, he's been hurt, and beaten in his mind, and he just gives up and quits.

There are times in which some fighters could have gotten back up after being knocked down but didn't, because they were beaten and knew it and just quit.

I'd also like to further note that not all punches hurt.

Fans watching a fight see a guy get punched and may think "that punch looked like it must have really hurt" but it didn't hurt.

Not all punches hurt in a fight!

Based on my experience you tend to get so busy out there in the ring in a fight that you don't even feel the punches.

Punches that hurt the most are to the body (the solar plexes) if a good hard solid punch there it really hurts.

Also punches to the kidneys can really hurt.

Those are the punches that can hurt most in a fight.

You can watch a fight and some punches look like they may have really hurt when it really didn't hurt.

JC
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
JCC said:
I think I know what your saying, but it could have (I say could have been) that Moorer JUST QUIT! That happens a lot in fights! A guy's tired, he's been hurt, and beaten in his mind, and he just gives up and quits.

There are times in which some fighters could have gotten back up after being knocked down but didn't, because they were beaten and knew it and just quit.

I'd also like to further note that not all punches hurt.

Fans watching a fight see a guy get punched and may think "that punch looked like it must have really hurt" but it didn't hurt.

Not all punches hurt in a fight!

Based on my experience you tend to get so busy out there in the ring in a fight that you don't even feel the punches.

Punches that hurt the most are to the body (the solar plexes) if a good hard solid punch there it really hurts.

Also punches to the kidneys can really hurt.

Those are the punches that can hurt most in a fight.

You can watch a fight and some punches look like they may have really hurt when it really didn't hurt.

JC
Getting hit in the solar plexes hurts a lot, and it knocks the wind out of you. But getting whacked clean in the nose hurts a lot too. Even if your not going to cry or even not on the verge of crying it still makes your eyes water.
 

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bill1234 said:
Getting hit in the solar plexes hurts a lot, and it knocks the wind out of you.
I'd won some fights by catching a guy on the ropes, and by catching him with a good, hard and solid left hook to the body in the solar plexes.

That kind of punch can hurt so bad that I can't even find words to fully describe what it feels like.

And it doesn't take much by just a good, short solid 6 inch punch there to often drop a guy, especially by a really hard puncher.

I'd seen guys go down in a fight after being hit there and in that way, and to not be after to catch their breath and to be counted out.

After having won a couple of fights in that way when I was boxing in the amateur ranks. It come to be my favorite thing to catch a guy on the ropes, and often to feint a right, or to intentional miss with a right, to set me up into a position to come up on my toes to really lay in a very hard left hook to the body.

Practice, practice, practice, I did in the gym in coming to be able to throw a really good hard left hook.

I got so good in throwing a left hook that it came to be near my best weapon.

And to throw a double left hook was even better, and to go from the body to the head, when as the guy's hands went down, after catching him to the body with a good left hook and the opening for the shot to the head came.

bill1234 said:
But getting whacked clean in the nose hurts a lot too. Even if your not going to cry or even not on the verge of crying it still makes your eyes water.
I know what you mean, in the gym when that happens. But on fight night in the arena and when you step into the ring, you can be so focused ... and that's VERY important ... and into the fight and so busy that there are going to be a lot of punches that may have even been hard you may not even feel for reasons you can get so busy with what your doing in a fight.

I was always real keyed up on fight night in the dressing room before a fight, and I'd get that adrenaline rush.

It would really be pumping as I would make my way from the dressing room to the ring, and especially if I knew the guy I was facing was a good fighter.

JC
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
JCC said:
I'd won some fights by catching a guy on the ropes, and by catching him with a good, hard and solid left hook to the body in the solar plexes.

That kind of punch can hurt so bad that I can't even find words to fully describe what it feels like.

And it does take much by just a good, short solid 6 inch punch there to often drop a guy, especially by a really hard puncher.

I'd seen guys go down in a fight after being hit there and in that way, and to not be after to catch there breath and to be counted out.

After having won a couple of fights when I was boxing in the amateur ranks it come to be my favorite way to do, to catch a guy on the ropes and often to feint a right, or to intentional miss with a right, to set me up into a position to come up on my toes to really lay a very hard left hook to the body.

Practice, practice, practice, I did in the gym in coming to be able to throw a really good hard left hook.

I got so good in throwing a good left hook that it came to be near my best weapon.

And to throw a double left hook was even better, and to go from the body to the head, when as the guy's hands went down, after catching him to the body with a good left hook and the opening for the shot to the head came.



I know what you mean, in the gym when that happens. But on fight night in the arena and when you step into the ring, you can be so focused ... and that VERY important ... and into the fight and so busy that there are going to be a lot of punches that may have even been hard you may not even feel for reasons you can get so busy with what your doing in a fight.

I was always real keyed up on fight night in the dressing room before a fight, and I'd get that adrenaline rush.

It would really be pumping as I would make my way from the dressing room to the ring, and especially if I knew the guy I was facing was a good fighter.

JC
One of my favoriite combos to see is a feinted right and a double left hook to the head. I also like the left hook to the body then to the head. Are you left or right handed? I am right handed, and my right Ive been told by about 5 different people, is really powerful.I have a fast snapping jab too. My style is to walk forwards and circleing jabing and throwing rights. JCC what was your style?
 

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That Suspect Chin is one of the few (some say many) reasons as to why people don't take Lennox Lewis seriously... even after all that he did! His only two losses... were against "Not So Big Stars"... they got him good on that "Suspect Chin" of his... and that will haunt Lennox Lewis forever and ever!!!
 

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bill1234 said:
One of my favorite combos to see is a feinted right and a double left hook to the head.

I also like the left hook to the body then to the head.
Your me and I'm you. I like that too.


bill1234 said:
Are you left or right handed?
No, I'm not a south paw. I'm right handed.

bill1234 said:
I am right handed, and my right Ive been told by about 5different people, is really powerful.
If only one person says it. It may or may not be true.

But if many people say it, it may likely be true.

You've had near about a half dozen people tell you that you've got a big punch in your right hand, you mostly likely do.

When you begin to know your strenghts you want to cultivate your strengths all the more.

Often a guy who had a big punch in his right hand will later come to have it both hands.

Not always that is true, but often will happen in time and with experience.


bill1234 said:
I have a fast snapping jab too. My style is to walk forwards and circleing jabing and throwing rights.


JCC what was your style?
Well, basically in a certian sense while styles may vary. But basically there are two kinds of fighters: "boxers" and "punchers."

And basically the strategy to win is for the "boxer" to box the "puncher" and for the "puncher" to punch the "boxer."

When I was boxing in the amatuer ranks in time and as I come to have more experience. I think I came to be pretty versatile in that way.

It came to more depend on who my opponent was and to determine what was the best way to fight him to win.

But often I never knew any thing about my opponents really until I got into the ring.

If I knew little or nothing about my opponent, I'd have to figure it out early during the fight.

I had to reply on my trainer and my corner to help me with that.

In facing some opponents I saw that I would have to box him to win, and with others that I would have to crowd them and to fight on the inside and to be the puncher instead of the boxer to win.

I hope your understanding what I'm trying to say.

In time and with more experience I came to be very versatile as for my style.

But I was not able to develop that over night. It took years of experience and training to develop it.

I came to have the punch in both hands.

I say I did, or at least think I did, for reasons that about half, actually a little more than half the fights I had that I won was either by a knockout, or technical knockout.

After I gained more experience and to have always fought open. That is, in the open class in my weight division first as a middle weight, and later as a light heavyweight. In those days there was only eight weight divisions.

I'd say the fights I won after I came to have more experience weren't primarily for reasons of power and speed, but more for reasons of strategy. Just knowing how to fight!

Hard for me to talk about this without appearing to be boasting.

But of course, many fighters tend to think they were a little better than they actually are, and I guess in that way I'm no exception. (smiling)

I think I came to be able to do it all.

By that I mean I could box, punch, and had defensive skills.

But you know already I think how young I was when I started.

In 1960, at age 9, I took up boxing in a gym at a boys club, and continued to box into my early twenties in early 1970s.

I guess you could say my style was to be a puncher, or slugger, and at other times to be the boxer. It just depended on who my opponent was what I had to do to win.


JC
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
JCC said:
Your me and I'm you. I like that too.




No, I'm not a south paw. I'm right handed.



If only one person says it. It may or may not be true.

But if many people say it, it may likely be true.

You've had near about a half dozen people tell you that you've got a big punch in your right hand, you mostly likely do.

When you begin to know your strenghts you want to cultivate your strengths all the more.

Often a guy who had a big punch in his right hand will later come to have it both hands.

Not always that is true, but often will happen in time and with experience.




Well, basically in a certian sense while styles may vary. But basically there are two kinds of fighters: "boxers" and "punchers."

And basically the strategy to win is for the "boxer" to box the "puncher" and for the "puncher" to punch the "boxer."

When I was boxing in the amatuer ranks in time and as I come to have more experience. I think I came to be pretty versatile in that way.

It came to more depend on who my opponent was and to determine what was the best way to fight him to win.

But often I never knew any thing about my opponents really until I got into the ring.

If I knew little or nothing about my opponent, I'd have to figure it out early during the fight.

I had to reply on my trainer and my corner to help me with that.

In facing some opponents I saw that I would have to box him to win, and with others that I would have to crowd them and to fight on the inside and to be the puncher instead of the boxer to win.

I hope your understanding what I'm trying to say.

In time and with more experience I came to be very versatile as for my style.

But I was not able to develop that over night. It took years of experience and training to develop it.

I came to have the punch in both hands.

I say I did, or at least think I did, for reasons that about half, actually a little more than half the fights I had that I won was either by a knockout, or technical knockout.

I could punch, but I could box too.

After I gained more experience and to have always fought open. That is, in the open class in my weight division first as a middle weight, and later as a light heavyweight. In those days there was only eight weight divisions.

I'd say the fights I won after I came to have more experience weren't primarily for reasons of power and speed, but more for reasons of strategy. Just knowing how to fight!

Hard for me to talk about this without appearing to be boasting.

But of course, many fighters tend to think they were a little better than they actually are, and I guess in that way I'm no exception. (smiling)

I think I came to be able to do it all.

By that I mean I could box, punch, and had defensive skills.

But you know already I think how young I was when I started.

In 1960, at age 9, I took up boxing in a gym at boys club, and continued to box into my early twenties in early 1970s.

I guess you could say my style was to be a puncher, or slugger, and at other times to be the boxer. It just depended on who my opponent was what I had to do to win.


JC
I didn't think you were boasting at all. What they are working on with me now is defence, and new punch combos. They are teaching me on the mits how to do a left jab, immeadiately after the jab a left uppercut, then a left hook, a right cross, left hook to the body, then left hook to the head, duck (they will take a swing at me), then a right cross, left hook, and another right cross, then I am finished and have to do it all over again. In defence wise... I am doing the rope, and this weird thing (I don't know what it is called), it is like a double end bag without the bottom strap, its height is adjustable, and it has sand in it. What you do with it is push, duck under it, throw some sort of punch, and duck under it again, maybe push it around, then duck under it again.
 
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