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-   -   Hitting the Heavy Bag (https://www.boxingforum.com/training-nutrition/753-hitting-heavy-bag.html)

Captainobvious 11-11-2006 11:50 AM

Hitting the Heavy Bag
 
Hitting the Heavy Bag

The heavy bag provides one of the best cardiovascular fitness and endurance training workouts available to a boxer. It helps to build your strength and stamina, and really helps you to develop your punches properly.

Heavy bags come in vinyl, synthetic leather, leather, and canvas. There are soft filled, foam lined, and water filled varieties. A water filled provides the best protection for your hands, while a soft filled large heavy bag will feel most like an opponent. You should pick a bag that suits your skill, size and ability level.

When working the heavy bag focus on proper foot spacing and proper punching form. A good workout to start out with to really get your endurance and power up is this:

Start out by jabbing only for 1 1/2 minutes single jabbing, doubling it up, and multiple jabs, body and head. After a round of jabbing work on your straight right. Once again single, then multiple. Drop down and shoot some to the body as well. After a 1 1/2 minute round of that, do a round of left hooks. work the head and the body, focusing on form and getting as many punches in as you can. Remember, when throwing the left hook, your right foot has to come up a half step, to keep your balance, and help you get some power behind it. After a 1 1/2 minute round of that, then mix it up with your combinations of all of those punches above. Work hard for a minute and a half, then repeat 1 more round of combination punching, really trying to burn yourself out, but keep correct form at all times. Work on your footwork and movement around the bag, and always keep your proper spacing and balance. Hands up, elbows in and protected just like you would in the ring. Try to really burn yourself out in the last 30 seconds of each round. Throw quick combinations to the head and body and really get that "burn". This will really help to increase your stamina.
Once you build your endurance up, you can extend your round times to 2 mins, 2 1/2 mins, 3 mins, and so on.
Its also recommended that you keep a mouthpiece in while your hitting the bag, so that you really stay used to the difference in breathing with the mouthpiece. You should also make sure that your exhaling some air with your punches. This will help you to preserve energy.

Good Luck and Train Hard!

rhodes 11-14-2006 05:53 PM

free standing heavy bag
 
can you get a good workout with a free standing bag, i live in an apartment.

Captainobvious 11-14-2006 07:41 PM

You can certainly get a good workout with a free standing bag. One of the big benefits of a free-standing bag is that it can be moved around fairly easily, so its great for tighter living arrangements. They make some very nice quality ones now with water filled/sand filled/ or rock bag anchored bases. For the most part they are significantly lighter on the hands because they arent filled densely like a "real" heavybag. This translates to punches maybe not feeling as solid as they would on a normal bag, and some unstability with the base rocking, or wobbling. But thats one of the tradeoffs for not bolting something into the joice of your garage.
So to sum it up, yes you can get a very good workout with a free-stander, but you cant push it to your limits on the majority of them.
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bill1234 11-16-2006 08:48 PM

You can get a great work out doing that.

dutch1291 01-04-2007 01:26 AM

im kind of a newbie when it comes to boxing and punching bags, but i just purchased an everlast 70 lb bag. I'm 16, about 5'8 and around 135 lbs. I've found that whenever i continually hit it, it moves around quite a bit. I realize that i should have someone standing behind it, but is it possible to get a workout just by yourself, without a trainer/bag holder?? I apologize if this is a truely dumb question...

Captainobvious 01-04-2007 10:41 AM

Not a dumb question at all. First off, if the bag is "turning" when you are hitting it, you are not positioning yourself enough to the center of the bag. When you punch and the bag turns, your hitting more to the side than the center.
Sometimes if your punching the bag and it is swaying back and forth, you may be "pushing" the bag with your punches a bit too much. Adjusting your range from the bag back just a bit can reduce some of that. Remember, when your hitting the bag you want fast, snapping punches and you want to bring your arms back to a defensive position immediately, dont leave your extended punching arm out there too long.
If all else fails, then you can put an eye-hook in the floor, and use a bungee from the eye hole to the loop on the bottom of the bag, if one is provided. This will help to keep the bag from swaying too much.

bill1234 01-04-2007 08:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Captainobvious99
Not a dumb question at all. First off, if the bag is "turning" when you are hitting it, you are not positioning yourself enough to the center of the bag. When you punch and the bag turns, your hitting more to the side than the center.
Sometimes if your punching the bag and it is swaying back and forth, you may be "pushing" the bag with your punches a bit too much. Adjusting your range from the bag back just a bit can reduce some of that. Remember, when your hitting the bag you want fast, snapping punches and you want to bring your arms back to a defensive position immediately, dont leave your extended punching arm out there too long.
If all else fails, then you can put an eye-hook in the floor, and use a bungee from the eye hole to the loop on the bottom of the bag, if one is provided. This will help to keep the bag from swaying too much.


You are exactly right.

dutch1291 01-04-2007 09:16 PM

thanks!!!
 
thanks a ton captainobvious, that helps a lot!

JAYBOZ 01-04-2007 11:22 PM

I recently bought a 100lb heavy bag and had been doing some moderate workouts. Before beginning I looked up some tips and workouts to use with the bag since the only exposure I'd had was just about 4 months of training last year. I'm aware then that the intent with the bag is not to beat the crap out of it as hard as you can or you can injur your hands etc.

With this in mind I went to work with 14oz gloves. After about a week and a half of using it pretty much every 2 days, my hands were a sore, and I was getting a decent amount of pain in the fronts of my shoulders. I'm aware that I may have some rotator cuff issues from other activities, but I really didn't expect all this from the workouts I was doing.

After taking a couple of weeks off, my hands are fine, and my shouders are decent. My question would be, can you give me some guidelines that'll help from re-injuring? One thing I was thinking is that hooks I was throwing may have caused possible existing injuries in my shoulders to become inflamed. I think my form is ok, but maybe this is part of it?

I'd appreciate any help so I can get back to it.

Captainobvious 01-06-2007 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dutch1291
thanks a ton captainobvious, that helps a lot!

Sure thing, my friend! :thumbsup:


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